Search - The Gerry Mulligan All-Star Tribute Band;Lee Konitz;Bob Brookmeyer;Randy Brecker;Ted Rosenthal;Dean Johnson;Randy Vincent :: Thank You, Gerry! Our Tribute to Gerry Mulligan

Thank You, Gerry! Our Tribute to Gerry Mulligan
The Gerry Mulligan All-Star Tribute Band;Lee Konitz;Bob Brookmeyer;Randy Brecker;Ted Rosenthal;Dean Johnson;Randy Vincent
Thank You, Gerry! Our Tribute to Gerry Mulligan
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

Featuring Jazz legends Lee Konitz, Bob Brookmeyer, & Randy Brecker, with the rhythm section of Ted Rosenthal, Dean Johnson, and Ron Vincent, the CD Thank You, Gerry! is a moving and endearing tribute album to Cool Jazz ico...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: The Gerry Mulligan All-Star Tribute Band;Lee Konitz;Bob Brookmeyer;Randy Brecker;Ted Rosenthal;Dean Johnson;Randy Vincent
Title: Thank You, Gerry! Our Tribute to Gerry Mulligan
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Arkadia Jazz
Original Release Date: 6/30/1998
Re-Release Date: 6/16/1998
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Cool Jazz, Modern Postbebop, Bebop, Tributes
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 602267119121

Synopsis

Product Description
Featuring Jazz legends Lee Konitz, Bob Brookmeyer, & Randy Brecker, with the rhythm section of Ted Rosenthal, Dean Johnson, and Ron Vincent, the CD Thank You, Gerry! is a moving and endearing tribute album to Cool Jazz icon Gerry Mulligan. Every player demonstrates his appreciation and respect for baritone saxophonist, composer, and arranger Gerry Mulligan; both the man and the musician. On this beautiful recording (which was nominated for a Grammy Award for the song My Funny Valentine), you will hear the unforgettable melodies and brilliant compositions that will always be the signatures of Mulligan s sound. Whether performing on the epic Birth of Cool album with Miles Davis, Gil Evans, & John Lewis, working with Claude Thornhill and Stan Kenton, or playing Cool Jazz alongside Chet Baker, Gerry Mulligan is renowned for the light sounds of his virtuosic saxophone playing and his brilliant compositions. Perhaps the greatest Baritone sax player in Jazz history, Gerry Mulligan is honored on this extraordinary album by a group of prominent musicians who either played alongside the legend, or grew up under the influence of his indelible musical shadow.
 

CD Reviews

A Fascinating New Look at Great Old Tunes
07/24/1998
(4 out of 5 stars)

"The second Gerry Mulligan tribute released in 1998, "Thank You, Gerry! Our Tribute to Gerry Mulligan" (Arkadia) takes the opposite approach of the Three Baritone Sax Band. It leaves out the baritone voice entirely. This album features an all-star cast of Mulligan's most notable sidemen, including Randy Brecker, Bob Brookmeyer, and Lee Konitz, and modernized arrangements of some of Mulligan's more famous themes. It features tunes from the original pianoless quartet almost exclusively, reworked for a sextet with piano. The charts, by pianist Ted Rosenthal, bring out a different side of these eleven Mulligan classics. Instead of a heavy focus on two-voice, improvised counterpoint, the album utilizes more planned, pre-written interplay between the three lead voices. I can hardly stress enough the different sound created simply by exluding the baritone. As could be expected, the soloing is superb, especially from Brookmeyer and Brecker. Brookmeyer has per! fected the soloing style he developed with the Mulligan quartet, and anchors the group with incredible consistency. Brecker, on the other hand, provides a contrast to Brookmeyer and Konitz, improvising in a much more modern style. My single complaint with this album is its focus on Mulligan's oldest tunes. True, these tunes led to his initial rise to fame, and when fans speak of the Mulligan "sound," they most often refer to the original quartet. But it is a mistake to forget the other, amazingly productive, periods in Jeru's career, some of which are similarly worth of the tribute. In the liner notes, Dave Brubeck refers to Gerry as the "past, present, and future" of jazz; despite its flaws, this album emphasizes that point, drawing on Gerry's wide repertoire for an album of music as contemporary now as it was then. Jeff Sackmann (7/23/98)"