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The Techniques - Run Come Celebrate: Their Greatest Reggae Hits
Techniques
The Techniques - Run Come Celebrate: Their Greatest Reggae Hits
Genres: World Music, Pop, R&B
 

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Techniques
Title: The Techniques - Run Come Celebrate: Their Greatest Reggae Hits
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Rounder / Umgd
Release Date: 3/21/1995
Genres: World Music, Pop, R&B
Style: Reggae
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 011661762121, 011661762145, 011661762121
 

CD Reviews

Heaven meets Jamaica
erik1966lutig | Dubuque, IA USA | 06/02/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Imagine that a quartet of angels descended from heaven, arrived in Kingston, Jamaica in the mid-1960s, recorded for famed producer Duke Reid, scored a few hits, then faded back into the mists of relative obscurity.
Call those angels "The Techniques," and you get a sense of this collection of majestic rocksteady classics.
Powered by Slim Smith, then Pat Kelly -- two of the greatest vocalists to ever come from Jamaica -- and the vision of future hit-making producer Winston Riley, the Techniques stood tall during Jamaica's rocksteady era.
Songs such as "Love is Not a Gamble," "Queen Majesty" and the rollicking ska romp "Little Did You Know" became Jamaican classics, their rhythms versioned over and over again by deejays and dub engineers well into the 90s.
You'll remember this CD for the vocals, however: Peerless falsettos wed to close, soulful harmonies.
The Techniques even made their cover version sparkle. "My Girl," "I Wish it Would Rain" and even "Day-O" come alive as the Techniques step to the mic.
"Run Come Celebrate (Festival 68)," the fifth track, bounces along with a boundless joy, while "My Whole Life Depends on You" features a heart-breaking vocal performance by Slim Smith.
Some might say the evidence of the Techniques' greatness lies not in this set of songs, but in their subsequent endeavors. Riley went on to produce classics such as Tenor Saw's "Ring the Alarm." Frederick Waite emigrated to England, where he managed his sons in the band Musical Youth (of "Pass the Dutchie" fame). Junior Menz, Bruce Ruffin, Kelly, Jackie Parris, Lloyd Parks and Smith all went on to stellar solo careers. Not even the Paragons (led by John Holt) could equal the Techniques' legacy.
The group members' subsequent careers were impressive.
The resumes can't match these songs, however.
Not when you have angels involved."