Search - Royal Concertgebouw Orch, Jansons :: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 (Hybr)

Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 (Hybr)
Royal Concertgebouw Orch, Jansons
Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 (Hybr)
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #2

Ever since the tenure of conductor Eduard van Beinum, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra has maintained one of the greatest Bruckner symphonic traditions in the world. With this release of Bruckner's third and fourth sympho...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Royal Concertgebouw Orch, Jansons
Title: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 (Hybr)
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: RCOC Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/2009
Re-Release Date: 10/13/2009
Album Type: Hybrid SACD - DSD, Import
Genre: Classical
Style: Symphonies
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPC: 5425008376868

Synopsis

Product Description
Ever since the tenure of conductor Eduard van Beinum, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra has maintained one of the greatest Bruckner symphonic traditions in the world. With this release of Bruckner's third and fourth symphonies, Mariss Jansons and his Amsterdam-based orchestra add a new chapter to the RCO's impressive performance and recording history of Bruckner's works. In Jansons' view, the refinement of Bruckner's music -- however grandiose it may be --will always win out over grandiloquence. Under Jansons' baton, Bruckner has a warm, beating heart: his rhythms are not simply played, they are, above all, experienced.
 

CD Reviews

Mellifluous, well-played, cautious Bruckner, if that's your
Santa Fe Listener | Santa Fe, NM USA | 11/16/2009
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Mariss Jansons has only recently turned to Bruckner as a recording project, almost simultaneously releasing the Seventh Sym. with his other orchestra, the Bavarian Radio, on Sony to coincide with this live in-house recording of the Third and Fourth with the Royal Concertgebouw. Always a smooth technician, Jansons gets a lovely sound from an orchestra whose solid tradition in Bruckner extends from Van Beinum, Jochum, and Haitink to Chailly. But there has also been a tendency in all these recordings to downplay the drama inherent in bruckner's idiom, and Jansons carries that to a fault. These are cautious, well-rounded readings that are often so passive that they stop dead in their tracks. Bruckner is a start-and-stop composer, but when a performance has caught fire, each pause implies forward motion to the next paragraph, and if you are lucky, the tension in the silences is actually greater.

That's not the case here. Not only are the pauses dead air, there's not a lot of imagination or drama when the music itself wants to drive forward. I heard some eloquent passages in the two slow movements and a few exciting bits in the finales, but not much more. Jansons' admirers may enjoy comparing his style with Chailly's and Haitink's, but I'll happily bypass all three. Offhand, I"d say that his performances are the neatest and most compact, for what that's worth. In good conscience I tired to dig up information about which editions are being used -- my download copy contains no notes -- but after being stymied at various online stores and the RCO's own website, I gave up. This isn't Bruckner as I appreciate him, and I doubt I will get past the first listen to either work."