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Suzanne Vega
Suzanne Vega
Suzanne Vega
Genres: Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

Though not the songs that would put her on the pop music map--that would come with 1987's Solitude Standing--Vega's first album shows her folky songwriting origins and, song for song, may still be her best. Produced by Pat...  more »

      
   

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Though not the songs that would put her on the pop music map--that would come with 1987's Solitude Standing--Vega's first album shows her folky songwriting origins and, song for song, may still be her best. Produced by Patti Smith guitarist Lenny Kaye, the sound is softly sculpted by Kaye's silvery guitar and an airy, occaisonal string section, matching the dream-like introspection of "Queen and the Soldier" and the surreal word play of "Small Blue Thing." Vega's philosophical, quiet, but confident approach would open the door for a second generation of female singer-songwriters like Dar Williams and Shawn Colvin. Her debut remains an unassuming sleeper for one of the '80s best folk or pop albums. --Roy Francis Kasten

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Member CD Reviews

David N. (ilikeallmusic) from GADSDEN, AL
Reviewed on 2/25/2007...
Just like new, with all artwork and booklet
0 of 2 member(s) found this review helpful.

CD Reviews

A Perfect Debut
dkre | Washington, DC United States | 09/09/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Suzanne Vega personified the neo-folk revival with this beautifully crafted literate album. Vega carves out a niche that she alone occupies with her hushed and stacatto singing style that recalls beat poets and confessional singer songwriters of the Leonard Cohen variety. Vega's spare guitar accompaniment jars and cajoles the listener into ruminations on self, love, loss, uncertainty, destiny. Stand outs include "Marlene on the Wall" an urgent portrait of Vega's affairs of the heart, all conducted under the ironic gaze of the poster-sized Marlene Dietrich; "Small Blue Thing" self-examination in the palm of a hand; "Some Journey" a soaring reflection on missed opportunity; "The Queen and the Soldier" a picture of willful arrogance that recalls the rich storytelling tradition of the Child ballads; "Neighborhood Girls" hipsters who are gone gone gone. Tactile and visceral images are juxtaposed in a sensual lyricism that reveals Vega as a maturing self who is reflective, protean, and open. The production values underscore the quiet intensity and overall moodiness of the album. A stunning set of songs that still inspires and moves."
Pure, clean, scary
Michael A. Cohn | Ann Arbor, MI, USA | 01/10/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Whenever I talk about this first album, fellow fans are quick to point out that Suzanne's voice is not yet properly trained, and that the production values are bottom-of-the-barrel. I agree, but I don't care. These songs have a clean, piercing purity which I think is sometimes lost in her later work. This is definitely her edgy-slightly-unhinged folk-singer face, so it may not be for people who prefer her more energetic or sound-oriented work.I also believe that the entire album is an associative poem, but this is still an unverified quack theory."