Search - Superchunk :: Tossing Seeds: Singles 89-91

Tossing Seeds: Singles 89-91
Superchunk
Tossing Seeds: Singles 89-91
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Japanese exclusive release. 2 compilation albums released in 1992 & 1995, respectively, released on 1 CD.

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Superchunk
Title: Tossing Seeds: Singles 89-91
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Merge Records
Original Release Date: 6/2/1992
Re-Release Date: 4/13/1993
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
Styles: Indie & Lo-Fi, American Alternative
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 036172932023

Synopsis

Album Description
Japanese exclusive release. 2 compilation albums released in 1992 & 1995, respectively, released on 1 CD.

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CD Reviews

Fantastic 7-inch collection
Joseph Murphy | 06/30/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"'Tossing Seeds' and 'No Pocky for Kitty' was my introduction to Superchunk and though the latter is probably a better choice, you do get some very cool nuggets of post-punk power pop in these 13 songs. The covers stand out as covers should: loyal to the original, but still retaining the stamp of the interpreter. The Sebadoh songs are fantastic and listening to them side-by-side with their originals is a tutorial in itself on how to cover a song. 'Train from Kansas City' is just ..... great.There are a coupla punky rave-ups that don't register with me ("Night Creatures", "Fishing"), but the remainder of the album is solid. There's even a song about writing songs ("Cool") that speaks to the nerd rock star wannabe in all of us."
More than just "Slack"
John M. Abbott | Oakland, CA USA | 12/03/2005
(4 out of 5 stars)

""Slack" of course, was the blazing single about workplace resentment that put Superchunk on the map. But this collection is bursting with worthy stuff.

One standout is the defiant "My Noise," wherein Mac declares that, even if what he's playing is stupid, he loves it and he is driven to play it for anyone who will listen. He also bristles with confidence on "Cool," written in the spirit of the old saw about how good composers borrow and great composers steal. "What Do I" leads the album off nicely, and "The Breadman" is punchy.

You'll probably enjoy the version of "Cast Iron" that appears on No Pocky For Kitty; the production is a little fuller. But this album's "Seed Toss" and the No Pocky For Kitty version are equally good."