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Strauss - Die ägyptische Helena / G. Jones, J. Thomas, Gruberova, Glossop, Schreier, Wiener Staatsoper, Krips
Richard Strauss, Wiener Staatsoper, Josef Krips
Strauss - Die ägyptische Helena / G. Jones, J. Thomas, Gruberova, Glossop, Schreier, Wiener Staatsoper, Krips
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #2

This double-CD set is part of a series of remastered historical recordings called "Wiener Staatsoper Live." Richard Strauss's inexplicably neglected Egyptian Helen had not been seen at the Staatsoper for 36 years by the ti...  more »

      
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All Artists: Richard Strauss, Wiener Staatsoper, Josef Krips, Gwyneth Jones, Edita Gruberova, Peter Glossop, Mimi Coertse, Peter Schreier, Jess Thomas
Title: Strauss - Die ägyptische Helena / G. Jones, J. Thomas, Gruberova, Glossop, Schreier, Wiener Staatsoper, Krips
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: RCA
Release Date: 1/25/2000
Album Type: Original recording remastered
Genre: Classical
Style: Opera & Classical Vocal
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPC: 743216942923

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This double-CD set is part of a series of remastered historical recordings called "Wiener Staatsoper Live." Richard Strauss's inexplicably neglected Egyptian Helen had not been seen at the Staatsoper for 36 years by the time this production was mounted to great acclaim in 1969. The director assembled a dream team--Gwyneth Jones in glorious, full-throated powerhouse mode, Jess Thomas giving new meaning to the word heroic as the heroic tenor, a young light-voiced Edita Gruberova in fine form in the supporting role of Hermione, and Peter Schreier as silvery and shining as ever. This is an archive recording, so there are authentic coughs and squeaks, and an unevenness of depth to the proceedings--but on the plus side, there's also a fantastic sense of the atmosphere and tension of a real-life performance. For those who don't know the work, listening to this recording will be a revelation: more concise than Der Rosenkavalier, it is its equal in richness of melody and orchestration. In a word: sumptuous. --Warwick Thompson
 

CD Reviews

A welcome addition to the catalogues
Vincent Lau | 03/05/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is a "live" recording (in good sound) of a performance given at the Vienna State Opera on 5th December, 1970. Although the opera is certainly not the high point of the Strauss/Hofmannsthal partnership, the sumptuous score still provides a fair amount of musical delights along the way.Helena was, according to legend, the most beautiful woman in the world at that time and, on stage, Gwyneth Jones must have possessed the requisite beauty and glamour for this taxing part. Vocally, her golden voice is strong across the range (although it is here a bit lighter than what it would become in later years) and her gleaming and fearless top can override the orchestra with ease which enables her to cope with the cruel tessitura of the part. Against that, the listener would have to put up with her wobble, which is particularly pronounced in her initial scene (she is generally in better control in Act II). To some, the wobble can mar the musical effect and compromise Strauss's soaring vocal lines. Nevertheless, at her best, the singing is radiant and incisive, and there is a fair amount of lyrical beauty as well as urgency which is appropriate to the drama. On the whole, despite the vocal imperfections, it is still a commanding performance.Jess Thomas makes a heroic Menelaus and he may also be quite an imposing figure on the stage. Nevertheless, as heard from this recording, the voice can turn coarse in some higher notes and the singing cannot be termed subtle. Mimi Coertse's resiliant voice (including a glowing top) makes her a fine Aithra and Margaritha Lilowa's Erda-like tone is suitable for the Omniscient Mussel. Peter Glossop is a sonorous but rather gruffy Altair while Peter Scheirer provides beauty of tone, a fine sense of legato, as well as intensity of utterance for the part of Da-ud. Gruberova is, however, rather anonymous in her few bars as Hermione. The Maids and Elves are all well cast and the chorus provides good support.In the pit, Josef Krips and the Orchestra of the State Opera present a dramatic and urgent reading of this rather garish score. However, there are also moments of great beauty and sensitivity, as in the wonderfully evocative ending of Act I. The orchestral playing is generally good (although not particularly subtle) with energetic strings, agile woodwinds and a flamboyant brass section.Given the paucity of recordings of this opera, and despite the fact that there are some cuts in the score (for example, the brief final duet between Helena and Menelaus has been inexplicably excised), this should be a welcome addition to the catalogues."
Too generous to miss: don't skip, buy !
Vincent Lau | 10/15/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"On reading the headline "too incomplete to satisfy" below, I expected to find an indictment, by a Strauss specialist, of the choice of the "compact" score for this Viennese performance of Helena in 1970. The reviewer seems, instead, to be a Hofmannstahl fan and condemns the lack of a libretto.Skimpy packaging is the only ungenerous thing about this set. I would agree with Vincent Lau from Hongkong that this is a very welcome addition to the Strauss opera catalogue, and have nothing to add to his full and fair review of the performance. I had the good fortune to hear Gwyneth Jones in one of her last accounts of Elektra at the Bastille in Paris, and well remember her opening "Agamemnon" - for the first time in my experience, that vast auditorium was filled with thrilling vocal sound. The same seems to have been true in Vienna - you can hear the voice quite clearly resonating round the house at the end of Zweite Brautnacht, and can imagine the effect her opening lines in Act One had on the Viennese audience: she either silenced their coughing (this was December) or at any rate drowned it out.Some listeners may have trouble, as Mr Lau suggests, with Dame Gwyneth's ample vibrato and her inimitable (well, it would be best not to imitate it) way of swooping up to notes from a semitone below. As a friend of mine put it, "you may not be able to tell exactly what note you're hearing, but what a generous voice." (So generous, you might say, that you get a choice of notes for the price of one.) Some may also find her tempi slow (compared, say, to Rose Pauly in 1928, the year of the premiere, once available as a filler on Melodram). But what a performance, what an exciting evening it must have been.Whether or not most of us need the libretto is an open question. This is one of Hofmannstahl's farthest-fetched efforts. Those who already know Die Frau ohne Schatten might comment "From the man who brought you flying, frying fish and a chorus of unborn children... now, the omniscient mussel," for indeed an all-knowing mussel figures in the cast of Helena. We may or may not want to hang on its lips. The synopsis might be enough.Personally, I am glad to have - at last - a great performance of this rare work (I see no other complete recording on this site, for example) and for this reason give it five stars. Don't skip it and wait for a duller version with full libretto, buy it while it's still on sale!"
Fantastic, but flawed
Nora | 10/29/2002
(4 out of 5 stars)

"As one of the few recordings of Strauss' Egyptian Helen available, this set has a lot going to recommend it. This is an opera which lives or dies both by the conductor and the main singers. Krips' conducting is both clean and impassioned, the ideal mix for Strauss; he manages to keep the incredibly thick orchestral texture balanced, while creating a shimmery and full sound. Gwyneth Jones is in truly superb form as Helen. She is convincing vocally as the most beautiful woman in the world, and is only slightly squally and off-pitch, faults which do admittedly plague many of her other recordings. But really, when she takes the ending note of 'Zwiete Brautnacht' up an octave to end on a high B, a lot of vocal faults can be forgiven. Jess Thomas is also excellent in a truly brutal role. He has the ease on the top end which any Menelas must have to functionally sing the role. The other roles, especially Aithra, are handled well, and there's even a very short cameo by Gruberova.Why the downgrade for flaws, then? Knowing both versions of the opera (the original 1928, and the 1933 revision), I find the 1928 version (which is the edition published in the Complete Stage Works, and available in a live recording, conducted by Korsten--it's available on Amazon) rather superior to the revision. Particularly jarring is the ending of this recording, which sounds tacked together--and it should, because the fantastic ending duet for Menelas and Helen is inexplicably cut. The lack of a libretto is a handicap as well, as Strauss wrote his music very much in tune with the words, and the focus of this opera is on a psychological plot. It loses a lot without an understanding of exactly what the characters are thinking and worrying about.In summary, for sound and singing, this is a fantastic recording. But for anyone seriously interested in the opera, I recommend the complete recording on Dynamic, conducted by Korsten; get to know it, with the libretto, and then come to this recording to hear the music in its full splendor."