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Clinch Mountain Bluegrass
Stanley Brothers
Clinch Mountain Bluegrass
Genres: Country, Folk, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (22) - Disc #1

Vanguard combines 22 recordings from the 1959 and 1964 Newport Folk Festivals, giving the listener a chance to hear the legendary duo in live performance. Achingly beautiful ballads such as "Man of Constant Sorrow," "White...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Stanley Brothers
Title: Clinch Mountain Bluegrass
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Vanguard Records
Release Date: 8/31/1994
Genres: Country, Folk, Pop
Styles: Bluegrass, Classic Country, Traditional Folk, Contemporary Folk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 015707701822, 090204403929

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
Vanguard combines 22 recordings from the 1959 and 1964 Newport Folk Festivals, giving the listener a chance to hear the legendary duo in live performance. Achingly beautiful ballads such as "Man of Constant Sorrow," "White Dove," and "Rank Stranger" showcase the pure, passionate harmonies that mark their best work while "Orange Blossom Special," "How Mountain Girls Can Love," "Hard Times," and "Clinch Mountain Backstep" find the pickers, especially Ralph on banjo, generating considerable fire. Two unnecessary comedy routines and four repeated songs bog down this set, which can't replace the original Columbia and Mercury studio recordings. Still, the music here is of the highest order: Carter's rich lead vocals blend exquisitely with Ralph's raw mountain tenor. --Marc Greilsamer

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CD Reviews

Evolution of a classic band
A bookish fellow | Juneau, AK USA | 06/09/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This was the first Stanley Bros. record I bought. It's not their best, but it's a good introduction. It's loose, some songs are repeated, the comedy is endearingly awful, and there's a lot of banter between songs. However, this would have been sixties folk audiences' introduction to the band as well, and one gets a good flavor of their stage presence. Note the contrast between the two performances; the 1959 one has lots of hortfelt gospel tunes and flourishes, but by 1964 they've streamlined their sound and cut out the comedy -- a better performance, but it's missing something genuine that the earlier one had. By the way, Ralph's banjo is absolutely scorching, his solos on this record beat the bloomers off the studio versions."