Search - Sonny Stitt :: Low Flame

Low Flame
Sonny Stitt
Low Flame
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

Sonny Stitt was first and foremost among the Charlie Parker-inspired altoists, his bop even more blues suffused than Bird's, and he applied the same facility to tenor. As jazz fashions changed in the '60s, Stitt worked reg...  more »

      
?

Larger Image
Listen to Samples

CD Details

All Artists: Sonny Stitt
Title: Low Flame
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Prestige
Release Date: 12/28/1999
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 025218523622, 090204871681

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Sonny Stitt was first and foremost among the Charlie Parker-inspired altoists, his bop even more blues suffused than Bird's, and he applied the same facility to tenor. As jazz fashions changed in the '60s, Stitt worked regularly with organ accompaniment, putting increased emphasis on blues and ballads. This CD combines LPs from 1962 and 1964, and they present Stitt with his working band. With Don Patterson on organ and Billy James on drums throughout, and Paul Weeden on guitar for the first session, it looks like a funk combo, but looks can be deceiving. While they play the deepest and slowest blues on "Low Flame" and "My New Baby" to start these sessions, there's little funk. The band favors clarity, straight-ahead 4/4 time, and some dexterous bop. Patterson's organ is fleet and restrained, providing Stitt with light punctuations and rock-steady bass lines. Stitt plays gorgeous alto on much of the first session, adding soaring cadenzas to original ballads like Weeden's "Cynthia Sue." He plays tenor throughout the later recording (contra the liner note), going from the warm and bouncing "Misty" to the heated "The Eternal One." This is populist jazz (Stitt adds a homespun vocal to "Mama Don't Allow"), swinging and emotionally direct, yet innately artful. --Stuart Broomer

Similarly Requested CDs

 

CD Reviews

Two Sides Of Sonny
David B. Erickson | Asheville, NC United States | 04/17/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This album plus the "Soul Classics" compilation on Prestige provide half the picture of what Stitt was up to in the late '60s and early '70s. For much of the time, he went where the money was (and there wasn't very much money at all in anything but fusion in the early '70s): with an organ trio or quartet. Don Patterson is the organist on "Low Flame." He also appears on "Soul Classics" along with Jack McDuff and others. This is jazz with a lot of funky soul in it, not funky soul with a lot of jazz in it. And Stitt is in great form. The other half of the picture, the one without the grits and gravy, can be found on the "Endgame Brilliance" compilation on 32Jazz, with Sonny in a straight-ahead setting with Barry Harris on piano. Both halves have their distinct pleasures, and both have a premier bebop altoist/tenorist at the top of his mature form."
Sonny side up
msteak racecar | new york | 12/24/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is a really good Sonny Stitt session... one of his best compilation. These tracks will get you moving in the morning and bring a smile to you in the evening... this is what good groove is all about, simple, warm and sweet."