Search - Sonny Stitt :: Champ

Champ
Sonny Stitt
Champ
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

The hard swinging energy of the late 1950s post-bebop scene served Sonny Stitt well, and this long-unavailable reissue shows why. Stitt comes out kicking on the tenor sax, the instrument that helped him define himself away...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Sonny Stitt
Title: Champ
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: 32. Jazz Records
Release Date: 8/25/1998
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 604123208420

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The hard swinging energy of the late 1950s post-bebop scene served Sonny Stitt well, and this long-unavailable reissue shows why. Stitt comes out kicking on the tenor sax, the instrument that helped him define himself away from Charlie Parker in the early 1950s when the younger Stitt was a promising bop alto player. Pugilist references aside, The Champ blooms with Stitt smoldering on alto for "Sweet and Lovely" and then taking off again in a slack, strutting clip on "The Midgets." Trumpeter Joe Newman blows a fine, open trumpet, keeping his attack almost full-bore even when he uses a mute. Stitt, though, is the champ on this CD. He molds his tone to suit the supple stair-climb melody of "The Eternal Triangle," wringing every note for all its shades of blue. --Andrew Bartlett

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CD Reviews

Dream.
08/21/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If you like good and traditional Jazz, this is good for you! Enjoy, fly and dream with it! And all for a good price!"
Great tenor solos
11/16/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"sonny, as always belts out a great tenor, his back-up is outstanding. I want this one under my christmas tree."
Another Winner
Samuel Chell | Kenosha,, WI United States | 11/07/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Of the three artists whose every recorded moment I can't seem to resist purchasing--Sinatra, Miles, and Stitt--Sonny makes me question my consumer habits most. This album, like the 30+ others I have of him, has all the licks, formulae, cliches that I know by heart. There's hardly a single unpredictable moment from him, but his playing is so precise, polished, and perfect, its presence in varying musical contexts represents a refuge of beauty and sanity in an otherwise unstable world.The rhythm section, though largely unheralded, is arguably second to none. I recall the night at the Vanguard when Roy Brooks launched the Heath brothers into another time zone; and the night at Chicago's long defunct Brown Shoe when a heroic piano set by the neglected Duke Jordan erased the memory of Hank Mobley's embarassing collapse on the bandstand moments earlier; and no one played better walking bass lines than Sam Jones, who was one of the main reasons for the popular success of Cannonball's "live" dates on Riverside. And finally Joe Newman, a former Basie section man who fully understands his role on a session like this, is an ideal complement to Sonny.The only slight disappointment is the opening tune, "The Champ," yet another B flat blues. As much as Sonny loves the tonic note, he loves a B flat tonic note even more for some reason, coming back to it at least 3 times on his first 12-bar chorus. On the other hand, it's nice to know there are still some things that can always be counted on."