Search - Various Artists, Mark Snow :: Songs In The Key Of X: Music From And Inspired By The X-Files

Songs In The Key Of X: Music From And Inspired By The X-Files
Various Artists, Mark Snow
Songs In The Key Of X: Music From And Inspired By The X-Files
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Folk, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock, Soundtracks, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (15) - Disc #1

An influential TV series of the '90s has generated a dark, eerie, and vaguely campy set of "inspired-by" songs from a diverse group of musical fans. Pride of place here goes to three tracks: the Foo Fighters' delicious cov...  more »

      
   

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: Various Artists, Mark Snow
Title: Songs In The Key Of X: Music From And Inspired By The X-Files
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 37
Label: Warner Bros / Wea
Original Release Date: 3/26/1996
Re-Release Date: 3/22/1996
Album Type: Explicit Lyrics, Soundtrack
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Alternative Rock, Folk, Special Interest, New Age, Pop, Rock, Soundtracks, Metal
Styles: Electronica, Hardcore & Punk, Indie & Lo-Fi, Goth & Industrial, American Alternative, New Wave & Post-Punk, By Decade, 1990s, Adult Alternative, Progressive, Progressive Rock, Alternative Metal
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 093624607922, 093624607946

Synopsis

Amazon.com
An influential TV series of the '90s has generated a dark, eerie, and vaguely campy set of "inspired-by" songs from a diverse group of musical fans. Pride of place here goes to three tracks: the Foo Fighters' delicious cover of Gary Numan's "Down In The Park," a filthy remake of R.E.M.'s "Star Me Kitten" by literary lion William Burroughs, and a titanic, cross-generational collision between Rob Zombie and Alice Cooper on "Hands of Death (Burn Baby Burn)." Sheryl Crow's "On The Outside" is a toss-off in this company, while Mark Snow's famous X-Files theme loses its creepy edge in both extended and P.M. Dawn-remixed incarnations. --Jeff Bateman

Similar CDs


Similarly Requested CDs

 

Member CD Reviews

Daniel T. (alternadan) from MILWAUKEE, WI
Reviewed on 7/14/2006...
Stuff like this is what killed the show's cool factor...
0 of 1 member(s) found this review helpful.

CD Reviews

Two Secret Songs!
Diane Michener | Minneapolis, MN | 05/01/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This really is a great CD but it is VERY important to note one thing that is over-looked by 99.9% of the people who buy this CD: There are two hidden tracks before the first track. These can be found by rewinding from Track 1 past 0:00 into "negative time". When you get to -9:15 let go and there are two new songs. One is by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds called "Time Iesum Transeuntem et non Reverendem" (Dread the passage of Jesus for he will not return) and the other one is by The Dirty Three and is a version of the X-Files Theme. This is one of the best hidden tracks I have ever found on any album. A hint is given to you on the inside of the insert above the info for Track 1 that says "Nick Cave and The Dirty Three would like you to know that "0" is also a number" Great CD."
X-File fan or not, this is a great CD
Daniel Jolley | Shelby, North Carolina USA | 04/08/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Songs in the Key of X cannot really be called a soundtrack; it consists not of songs necessarily from The X-Files but songs inspired by and worthy of inclusion in the show. It's quite an eclectic mix, featuring many dark songs that sparkle with the horrid electricity one associates with The X-Files. The premiere track has to be Red Right Hand by Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds. This song is itself part of the lore and mythology of the show; any X-Files fanatic can tell you the story of how Chris Carter heard this song driving home from work one night and fell in love with it. Besides highlighting the road trip of abductee Duane Barry in Season Two, the song has also been featured prominently in the Scream movies, so this one will be familiar to many. Clearly, most of these songs are in the same dark, forceful vein - e.g., Danzig's Deep, Screamin' Jay Hawkins' Frenzy, and Hands of Death (Burn Baby Burn) from the powerhouse duo of Rob Zombie and Alice Cooper. Soul Coughing's contribution Unmarked Helicopters may best fit the milieu of The X-Files and is an excellent song to boot. The Foo Fighters, a band that has never really captured my attention, makes a nice addition with Down in the Park. Frank Black's Man of Steel was a pleasant surprise to me, having only heard a much different kind of performance from him on Gordon Gano's Hitting the Ground. The great variety of songs here means two things: there is something for everyone here, but every individual will also undoubtedly have a few tracks he/she doesn't particularly care for. Sheryl Crow's On the Outside is a perfectly good song, but it doesn't seem to fit here in my opinion. Elvis Costello's My Dark Life has potential but never succeeds in grabbing my attention. Star Me Kitten from William S. Burroughs & R.E.M. is just strange and almost unexplainable (it also is the primary reason for the Explicit Lyrics sticker on the cover). The big mystery here for me, though, is P.M. Dawn. Not only does their song If You Never Say Goodbye seem out of place, their remix of Mark Snow's excellent X-Files Theme is quite unnecessary given the greatness of Mark Snow's original version that starts this CD off with a bang. You don't have to be an X-Files fan to enjoy this CD, but fans will have much more appreciation of the ingenuity and creative track selection that went into this album. The liner notes feature some perfectly odd artist drawings of X-Files characters and scenes as well as statements about the album from X-Files bigwigs Chris Carter and David Was. One should not think this album was released just to make money off of the hot X-Files name; there is a lot of quality music here that one might not ever have the chance to discover on one's own."