Search - Scott Mckenzie :: San Francisco

San Francisco
Scott Mckenzie
San Francisco
Genres: Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

1999 compilation featuring 11 of the greatest hits by the '60s pop-star who co-wrote 'Kokomo' with the Beach Boys, including his top five smash 'San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair)' & the top 30 'L...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Scott Mckenzie
Title: San Francisco
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Epic Europe
Release Date: 6/3/1999
Album Type: Import
Genres: Pop, Rock
Style: Folk Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
1999 compilation featuring 11 of the greatest hits by the '60s pop-star who co-wrote 'Kokomo' with the Beach Boys, including his top five smash 'San Francisco (Be Sure To Wear Some Flowers In Your Hair)' & the top 30 'Like An Old Time Movie'. Sony.

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CD Reviews

A nightingale sings
Patricia A. Leneghan | Australia | 08/24/2007
(3 out of 5 stars)

"This cd was purchased recently, I have listened twice to this cd, will lots more, I was surprised at how crystal clear and beautiful scott's voice is, I liked his version of reason to believe and loved San Francisco. Just have to say he can sing!"
Was it all just a dream?
Steven Haarala | Mandeville, LA USA | 01/19/2008
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Oh, to be transported back to 1967. I know, you've heard it before, The Summer of Love, but it was beautiful. New ways of expression: peace signs, flowers, be-in's, love-in's. Gentleness and color everywhere. The words most in vogue were love, peace and brotherhood. And it seemed that some of this philosophy might actually infiltrate the political arena, paving the way for a new and better world. Musically, the genius of The Beatles inspired other artists to great heights. One of the most familiar sounds floating around like incense at the time was the celestial harmony of the Mamas & Papas. And one of their friends, Scott McKenzie, with a little help from John & Michelle Phillips of the M&P's, sang one of the most memorable lyrics of the time: "If you're going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair." It might sound corny now, but it didn't then.

I bought this CD after hearing "San Francisco" on the local oldies channel, with no idea of what the rest of the album would be like. I'm happy to say that I am not disappointed. Scott has a smooth tenor voice that is appealing and a little plaintive. It is a good fit for the material, mostly folk-rock of the time. Getting specific, there are two covers on the album that are "scaled down" in a similar manner. "Celeste", originally by Donovan, is less dramatic, less ornate in Scott's hands, but affecting nonetheless. Same for "Twelve-Thirty", originally by the M&P's. Three consecutive tracks - "Like An Old Time Movie", "No, No, No, No, No", and "Don't Make Promises" - have a lot in common. All three are about difficulties and disenchantment with a woman, all three have good string and horn arrangements, and all three sound pretty much like the music of the M&P's. (Not surprising, since John Phillips wrote "Like An Old Time Movie".) "It's Not Time Now", written by John Sebastian & Zal Yanovsky of the Lovin' Spoonful, is another good folk-rock song. "What's The Difference (Chapter II)", written by Scott, is a pretty ballad with strings and prominent reeds. "Rooms", also by John Phillips, stands out because it has a rather dark, meandering melody, more complicated than the average pop tune, and an offbeat guitar solo. The two tracks that I like least are "Reason To Believe", an attempt at a more "rock" sound, and "What's The Difference (Chapter I)", which is a little too light for my taste. But all in all, the album is very pleasant, and if you like the M&P's or other soft rock bands like The Carpenters, I think this CD will please you. A product of its time, it is a good reflection of its time also."