Search - Satoko Fujii :: Kitsune-Bi

Kitsune-Bi
Satoko Fujii
Kitsune-Bi
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1

A young Japanese player with chops to burn and a vibrant, post-Cecil Taylor-style imagination, Satoko Fujii has a fantastic feel for the pacing and drama of headstrong piano jazz. This set is made up of duos and trios with...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Satoko Fujii
Title: Kitsune-Bi
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Tzadik
Original Release Date: 2/16/1999
Release Date: 2/16/1999
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Pop
Styles: Far East & Asia, Avant Garde & Free Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 702397722021

Synopsis

Amazon.com
A young Japanese player with chops to burn and a vibrant, post-Cecil Taylor-style imagination, Satoko Fujii has a fantastic feel for the pacing and drama of headstrong piano jazz. This set is made up of duos and trios with drummer Jim Black, bassist Mark Dresser, and soprano saxophonist Sachi Hayasaka. Black's rattle trap drumming is an excellent foil for Fujii's dense pianism, her love of the bellowing low end on the keyboard. And Dresser extends the harmonic searching, proving himself ever the multifaceted player who can bow his bass into a singing frenzy and plunk it into a rhythmic steam. Fujii plays jumping lines and calmly dropped clusters around the whole affair, as if the setting were ideal for her to engage each player on terms unique to the instrument. The sound is lovely and wide open, and this might be one of Tzadik Records' best forays into the "New Japan" scene that has become one of label founder John Zorn's main inspirations. --Andrew Bartlett

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CD Reviews

Soundtrack to a Life
waldglyde | Sydney, New South Wales Australia | 04/05/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Good music, whether it's a song by the most disposable of pop, or a symphony by Mahler, lives through its ready incorporation into the lives of those who do not merely 'love' it, but come to 'live' it. Satoko Fujii's 'Kitsune-Bi'is, as instrumental jazz, perhaps more readily assimilable than most, and like a soundtrack it is obtrusive enough to underpin and emphasise, but not to dominate. By this I do not mean to suggest it is dinner party music, inane and ignorable. Instead, it is a soundtrack for imagined films, or films of life as we perceive it. And like life it is unpredicatble, prone to sudden changes of direction, and it is passionate, playful, at times disturbing. It is this very quality, driven by Fujii's striking piano, that makes it like all great jazz, and music in general, obedient to its own patterns of advance and reversal, marked by associations that seem at times dissonant, but at other times the only possible turn. In short, it is like thought, like dialogue, we must do some of the work here, like an instrument ourselves, and each listening, because we are at each moment a different person, is a new improvisation upon set lines. The album, like her past work, is a masterpiece of genre-hopping within cool and free jazz, postmodern chamber, even torch-song traditions. Underpinning the most timeless of understatements, and breaking out at unpredictable moments, is a fiercely experimental approach to rhythm and musicality. 'Drops' has a shimmering, gauzy quality, for instance, almost like Messiaen in its pianism, stretched over a tense and shifting rhythm, but with the instruments shifting in and out of the roles of skeleton and flesh - piano overbass and drums, bass over piano and drums. 'Sounds of Stone', a bravura piano solo, twists between Glass, Monk, Chopin and Schoenberg, almost from note to note. A work of consistent beauty and sustained musical imagination, Fujii's hypnotic 'Kitsune-Bi'asserts that vital quality at the core of the human spirit - creativity - at the same time as it is coloured with some of the darkness that makes that creativity seem even more vital. If the soundtrack helps to focus us, as we fill in the plotlines our lives, it will sound a lot like this."