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Saint-Saëns: Music for Cello
Camille Saint-Saens, Bengt Forsberg
Saint-SaŽns: Music for Cello
Genre: Classical
 
This record presents an unfamiliar corner of the cello repertoire in an excellent, persuasive performance. It includes Saint-SaŽns's two cello sonatas, as well as his perhaps most popular piece, The Swan, in two different ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Camille Saint-Saens, Bengt Forsberg
Title: Saint-SaŽns: Music for Cello
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Hyperion UK
Release Date: 11/16/1999
Album Type: Import
Genre: Classical
Styles: Chamber Music, Historical Periods, Classical (c.1770-1830), Instruments, Strings
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 034571170954

Synopsis

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This record presents an unfamiliar corner of the cello repertoire in an excellent, persuasive performance. It includes Saint-Saëns's two cello sonatas, as well as his perhaps most popular piece, The Swan, in two different versions: the original one and the arrangement by Leopold Godowsky for violin and piano, played here on the cello an octave lower. The first, better known sonata, Op. 32, has a tense, dramatic first movement; the slow movement is a simple chorale melody accompanied by short notes; the finale is a run-around. Indeed, fleet passagework is a major element of Saint-Saëns's style. The second sonata, Op. 123, opens with forceful assertiveness; then, in constant mood changes, becomes delicate and lyrical. The second movement is a scherzo with variations in many contrasting moods and characters. A simple, effusively expressive romanza is followed by a gracious, ardently songful finale. The original Swan, meant to be played with harp accompaniment, is simple, pensive, and touching; Godowsky's arrangement, with an elaborate piano part and all sorts of bravura feats and sound effects from the cello, turns it into a big bird of prey. Saint-Saëns, considered one of the greatest pianists of his day, gave both his violin and cello sonatas enormous, virtuosic piano parts; Forsberg plays them to perfection, brilliantly but not soloistically, and with just the right blend of steadiness and freedom. Lidström's tone is warm and beautiful, and he can vary and inflect it with bow and vibrato; his style is noble and restrained but expressive and involved. --Edith Eisler