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The Best of Roy Buchanan: 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection
Roy Buchanan
The Best of Roy Buchanan: 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection
Genres: Blues, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

This album compiles highlights from unjustly obscure guitarist Roy Buchanan's first solo albums for Polydor (1972-75), efforts that defined his country-blues-gospel roots and showcased the fiery, emotionally charged techni...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Roy Buchanan
Title: The Best of Roy Buchanan: 20th Century Masters - The Millennium Collection
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Polydor / Umgd
Original Release Date: 1/1/2002
Re-Release Date: 3/26/2002
Album Type: Original recording remastered
Genres: Blues, Pop, Rock
Styles: Electric Blues, Modern Blues, Blues Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 731458959120, 0731458959120

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This album compiles highlights from unjustly obscure guitarist Roy Buchanan's first solo albums for Polydor (1972-75), efforts that defined his country-blues-gospel roots and showcased the fiery, emotionally charged technique that awed even fellow guitar gods like Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck. In a 1971 interview, Buchanan confided, "This star business scares the hell out of me." That remark says much about both the guitar phenom's humble mindset and promising yet oft-troubled career. Buchanan apprenticed with '50s rockabilly star Dale Hawkins (and later, Hawkins's cousin Ronnie in the Hawks, soon to become the Band), but was in his 30s before he got the attention he so richly deserved. Buchanan's solos here often seem to bypass his conscious mind and connect directly with his complex, conflicted soul (he committed suicide in 1988). Contrasted with his plaintive, near-spoken vocals on spiritually disparate tracks like "The Messiah Will Come Again," "Hey Joe," and a live take on "I'm Evil," the solos can be gut-wrenchingly powerful. Buchanan's public acceptance was limited, but his playing continues to influence new generations; here are a dozen good reasons why. --Jerry McCulley

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CD Reviews

The blues (and theology) of Roy Buchanan
graffitiglenn | 05/21/2003
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I recently rediscoved Roy Buchanan at the advice of a friend. I owned one of his albums back in the mid seventies, but didn't follow up on him since. Then it happened. I was mesmerized by this collection, which is excellent except for one loser--"C.C. Rider." Besides this plodding, stupid song--in which Roy lacks the freedom to ascend into the telesphere--all the cuts are good and some are superb.

Roy's tone, given his long-time friend, the telecaster (most bluespeople use a stratocaster or a Gibson), has a bit of a country edge, but the playing is more blues than anything. I used to think that Stevie Ray Vaughn was the best ever, but now I'm not sure. Roy had chops Stevie lacked, especially the "chicken pickin" (I think that's the term for it) technique of choking off a note then hitting one fully. He uses this masterfully.

If you are a blues fan and a Christian, try listening to "The Messiah Will Come Again" without getting a bit choaked up. It is a simple plainspoken (not sung) take on the gospel. The "lonely, lonely, little town called the world" rejoiced at he coming of "a Stranger," but some mocked, and he went away. But "I've walked a lot of places that I never should have been, but I know that the Messiah, he will come again." Confession and hope of final redemption come through, even if the Cross is not explicitly mentioned. And what painfully beautiful playing!

No, Roy couldn't really sing--and he shouldn't have been made to try. The singing on "I'm evil" is barely audible and quite a juxtaposition to the powerful, searing playing. Nevertheless, the lyrics (by Roy) are rather amusing, and, in a strange way, telling. The song is in the Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker tradition of "Watch out for me, I'm bad." Roy sings, "I was born standin' up and talkin' back." Weren't we all? That's the problem, isn't it?

Roy's gone. He died mysteriously in a jail cell in 1988 in this "lonely, lonely little town called the world."

But the Messiah will come again.

Doug Groothuis"
Awesome Guitarist!!
jbembe | Ann Arbor, MI United States | 03/08/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Unfortunately, not all artists get the same exposure and popularity that equals the level of their talent. Roy Buchanan is one of those on the raw end of such an analysis. Having heard of him by those who compared him to Clapton (and irritatingly claimed that Roy was better) I decided to check out this Buchanan fellow for the sake of curiosity. My first impression of this disc was that it was very cerebral music, with little lyrics and far from the pop sensibilities Clapton brings to his music- making it less accessible. I was resistant to the music at first because it is very complex guitar work. After getting yoused to the disc, I really enjoy Buchanan's work! This remastered best of is actually quite a good album as compiled, I rarely buy such poorly packaged best of's and the only reason I got it is because it was on sale at the record store (for example I would never buy the millennium collection of Cream as opposed to remastered albums or the box set.) The first song is a wonder, an incredible aural experience, worth the price alone. CC Ryder is also a really fun song, and I find myself walking around with the background vocals repeating over and over in my head. "I'm Evil" is as menacing, cool, and bad to the bone as any hardcore wannabe artist who's all flash but no substance, but comes from a real guitarist who can blast you away with the effect of the song and killer guitar. If you like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Clapton, Zeppelin, Hendrix, and other heavy guitar based music, don't miss this. If you've heard of Buchanan and are wondering if you should devote your energy to what he's done, find this disc and add him to your collection, his guitar work is not to be missed!!"
20th Century Masters-The Best of Roy Buchanan
graffitiglenn | usa | 09/18/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Roy brings out the spiritual in his blues. It was and is gospel. His guitar is guided by his soulful heart. Songs like the "messiah will come again" let's the listener be witnessed to jesus's glory through blues because as Roy puts it, he went away. Also Roy can raise hell with his "I'm evil" and spit fire when his guitar stirs up the fever with "hey joe". One fine jam. The album has much to write about and more to listen to from a temporary lost soul. The saddest song to listen to but beautiful just the same is "five string blues". His few short lines are "Jesus this is my final plea,i'm still beg-gin you, don't let the devil get the best of me". sad words when we know Roy Buchanan is no more. i believe Jesus sheltered him from the storm... play on dear brother......."