Search - Robert Carver, Cappella Nova, Alan Tavener :: Robert Carver Vol. 2: 6 Part Mass; 4 Part Mass 'L'homme armé'

Robert Carver Vol. 2: 6 Part Mass; 4 Part Mass 'L'homme armé'
Robert Carver, Cappella Nova, Alan Tavener
Robert Carver Vol. 2: 6 Part Mass; 4 Part Mass 'L'homme armé'
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1

To really understand what was going on musically in Britain during the 16th century, a visit to Scotland would have been necessary. There you certainly would have encountered the works of Robert Carver, whose music is expl...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Robert Carver, Cappella Nova, Alan Tavener
Title: Robert Carver Vol. 2: 6 Part Mass; 4 Part Mass 'L'homme armé'
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Gaudeamus
Release Date: 12/21/1993
Genre: Classical
Styles: Opera & Classical Vocal, Chamber Music, Historical Periods, Classical (c.1770-1830)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 743625012620, 5011975012627

Synopsis

Amazon.com
To really understand what was going on musically in Britain during the 16th century, a visit to Scotland would have been necessary. There you certainly would have encountered the works of Robert Carver, whose music is explored by Scotland's own professional a cappella ensemble, Cappella Nova, on three discs. Carver's style is easily recognized for its slowly moving harmonic rhythm, high soprano parts, and melodies that seem to arise from--rather than determine--the harmony. The Mass l'Homme Arme reflects a common practice of this period, in which a new work was created from a pre-existing piece--a song or motet, for instance. The French song used for Carver's mass was used by many composers from Josquin to Palestrina; and while Carver's version doesn't rival either of theirs, it shows an originality of sound and texture that engagingly sets it apart. --David Vernier
 

CD Reviews

Interesting open harmonies
M. J. Smith | Seattle, WA USA | 10/27/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"In many ways this album is simply one of a number of excellent albums of renaissance polyphony. The quality of the performance itself makes this album stand out - wonderful walls of choral sound. One aspect of Carver's work that is well displayed here is the open harmony where the voices cross above or below each other, any given voice requiring a substantial range. The second notable aspect is the rhythmic complexity in some of the more elaborate passages.All three volumes of this series are worth having, but this volume is perhaps this best starting album."