Search - Rhys Chatham Ensemble :: Rhys Chatham: An Angel Moves Too Fast To See

Rhys Chatham: An Angel Moves Too Fast To See
Rhys Chatham Ensemble
Rhys Chatham: An Angel Moves Too Fast To See
Genres: Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1

This NY-born composer began as a classically-trained prodigy, but by 1975, Chatham was fusing the overtone-drenched minimalism of John Cale and Tony Conrad with the relentless, elemental fury of The Ramones. It was an insp...  more »

      
?

Larger Image

CD Details

All Artists: Rhys Chatham Ensemble
Title: Rhys Chatham: An Angel Moves Too Fast To See
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Table of Elements
Original Release Date: 1/1/2006
Re-Release Date: 6/6/2006
Genres: Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classical
Styles: Avant Garde & Free Jazz, Experimental Music, Historical Periods, Modern, 20th, & 21st Century, Instruments, Electronic
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 806501180223

Synopsis

Album Description
This NY-born composer began as a classically-trained prodigy, but by 1975, Chatham was fusing the overtone-drenched minimalism of John Cale and Tony Conrad with the relentless, elemental fury of The Ramones. It was an inspired amalgamation; the textural intricacies of the avant-garde colliding with the visceral punch of electric guitar-slinging punk rock, and with it Rhys created a new type of urban music. Raucous and ecstatic, this sound energized the downtown NY scene throughout the late '70s and early '80s, prefiguring the No Wave movement, and casting a huge influence over the subsequent work of Glenn Branca and Sonic Youth. "An Angel" is one of the most extraordinary works in the minimalist canon, one that demonstrates the majesty inherent in Chatham's amplified imagination. This lavish CD presents this sonic revolution in all its glory, and cements Rhys' reputation as a monolithic figure astride both rock and classical music. "As 'An Angel Moves Too Fast To See' unfolds, it develops an extended sense of grandeur that should be obvious to anyone. If some segments function very well as art rock, others really transcend all known genres - just huge wallows in oceans of sound" - Byron Coley, The Wire.

Similar CDs

 

CD Reviews

You've got the wrong guy
Starry Vere | Silver Lake OH USA | 06/13/2007
(2 out of 5 stars)

"Pay no attention to the above puff-piece review, as it is 90% fiction. Chatham's stuff was always surprisingly bland and, for that matter, not all that highly regarded at the time, especially compared to the composer's own self-promoting claims of history-making. To paraphrase the other user's review "forget about Chatham, Branca is the real deal.""
OK for one chord
SP | denton, TX USA | 06/20/2007
(2 out of 5 stars)

"I was hoping for a lot more harmonic progression. Listened to this once and not sure I heard much besides the tonic chord. Maybe there's some great subtlety I can't hear at low volume?? Or maybe the king's new clothes aren't really there. (Funny how many people compare today's "serious" music to the Emperor's New Clothes!) Not sure why this music is compared to that of Glenn Branca, whose music is SO much more interesting.
"
The lay of the land is filled with electricity
J. GARRATT | 01/11/2010
(5 out of 5 stars)

"For me, the coolest thing about numerous electric guitars playing in unison is that it isn't exactly "unison." Just like a singer can never sing the same line twice the exact same way, electric guitars piled on top of each other creates a chorus effect that makes music like this so cool. The effect is a great sonic wash that can sound like water crashing on rocks or a swarm of bees coming after you. I haven't listened to Rhys Chatham for very long but "An Angel Moves Too Fast To See" already feels like an undisputable high point. But from the looks of this page and the average star rating, I can see it is disputable.

What this five movement piece lacks in variance it makes up with everything else that makes guitar music enjoyable. The mid-tempo romps are my personal favorites but the slow burning tension of "No Trees" can go a long way in capturing one's imagination and taking it to a haunted house. Along with Branca, Chatham has carved out a unique musical world for himself through the use of electric guitars stomping the campground yet barely leaving a footprint. I like Branca and Chatham both, is that gonna be a problem?

As I look at the cover I am reminded of an essay by David Sedaris where he ponders the cover art of many an LP sleeve in his house. Many are capturing a far away gaze as if the main subject were listening to music. The child looking up in a hopeful glance is offset by the woman looking downtrodden in her turn downwards, as if she were shuddering in regret. It almost looks like the two of them are looking for that elusive angel, too fast to see, too mysterious to grasp."