Search - Red Simpson :: Truck Drivin Fool

Truck Drivin Fool
Red Simpson
Truck Drivin Fool
Genres: Country, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Released in 1967, Red Simpson?s Truck Drivin? Fool continued the focus of his debut album: examining the good and the treacherous, the amusing and sobering sides of trucker life. Today, Simpson, considered a Bakersfield le...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Red Simpson
Title: Truck Drivin Fool
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sundazed Music Inc.
Release Date: 7/27/2004
Genres: Country, Pop
Styles: Roadhouse Country, Classic Country
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 090771900425

Synopsis

Album Description
Released in 1967, Red Simpson?s Truck Drivin? Fool continued the focus of his debut album: examining the good and the treacherous, the amusing and sobering sides of trucker life. Today, Simpson, considered a Bakersfield legend, continues performing around his hometown.
 

CD Reviews

Second volume of superb trucker country
hyperbolium | Earth, USA | 12/24/2004
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Simpson's fourth album reverts to the successful trucker-themed concept of his 1966 debut. And much like the debut, his Bakersfield roots shine through in twangy backings that echo the sound coined by his occasional songwriting partner Buck Owens. As on the debut, Simpson sings of the road's hardships in a matter-of-fact manner that works well with his limited range and adds a convincing note of authority.

The album opens with "Diesel Smoke, Dangerous Curves," Cal Martin's tale of a hard-charging driver on a winding mountain road. Unlike Doye O'Dell's original 1952 waxing, Simpson's is understated, with steel guitar providing the sound a truck hanging on to the curves and an edgy lead guitar to heighten the drama. There's plenty of truckin' lingo (which differs from the kitschy CB buzzwords of 1970s trucker hits) on tunes like "Sleeper, Five-By-Two" and "Jackknife," bringing to mind the mid-60s car-song collaborations of Brian Wilson and Roger Christian.

Though Simpson focuses on the wear-and-tear of the trucker's life on "Born to Be a Trucker" and "Piggyback Blues," there's a lighter, happier side to be found on the Simpson-Owens co-write, "Truck Daddy," and the title track is as contented as a driver on a wide-open road with a full tank of gas. The only real misfire in this collection is a rendition of "A Tombstone Every Mile" whose happy-go-lucky delivery loses the gravity of Dick Curless' original.

Simpson's engaging songs and everyman delivery, his band's twangy arrangements and Ken Nelson's crisp production elevate this far beyond a novelty collection of trucking tunes. Along with Buck Owens classic Capitol albums, this is an essential element of the Bakersfield canon."