Search - Raymond Scott :: The Rock 'n Roll Symphony

The Rock 'n Roll Symphony
Raymond Scott
The Rock 'n Roll Symphony
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (24) - Disc #1

Raymond Scott is one of the music world's most obscure heroes. He is the inventor of the Clarivox and Audivox, and, as such, the founding father of Electronic music. He was the mentor to Bob Moog, and his music has been he...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Raymond Scott
Title: The Rock 'n Roll Symphony
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Acrobat
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Release Date: 1/1/2008
Album Type: Import
Genres: World Music, Jazz, Special Interest, Pop, Rock, Classical
Styles: Latin Music, Tango, Swing Jazz, Vocal Jazz, Marches, Easy Listening, Vocal Pop, Opera & Classical Vocal, Historical Periods, Modern, 20th, & 21st Century
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 824046423322, 0824046423322, 082404642332

Synopsis

Album Description
Raymond Scott is one of the music world's most obscure heroes. He is the inventor of the Clarivox and Audivox, and, as such, the founding father of Electronic music. He was the mentor to Bob Moog, and his music has been heard but not recognized by almost everyone on the planet, Raymond Scott's work 'Powerhouse' being the music used by Warner Brothers on the Looney Tunes cartoons. Other outlets that used his music include The Simpsons and Ren & Stimpy to name a few. He has also written music for many feature films, including working with Alfred Hitchcock (The Trouble With Harry) and Harold Robbins (Never Love A Stranger). This album was recorded whilst Scott was head of A & R at Everest Records which was owned by Harry Belock. 24 tracks. Acrobat. 2007.
 

CD Reviews

Pointless music, HORRIBLE remastering.
Kimba W. Lion | the East Coast | 02/01/2008
(1 out of 5 stars)

"Raymond Scott, so often the quirky innovator, really fell flat on his face with this album. Arranged to please other people rather than himself, the music is blander than bland, failing to evoke the flavor of either rock and roll or symphonic music. A couple of tracks rise to the level of decent MOR, but not really worth the wade through the rest.

The remastering for CD is a pure amateur job. Treble-heavy, with no bass, and a gee-I-can-do-hiss-removal approach to noise reduction that has left a heavy cloud of digital burbles and other artifacts over the music that is far worse than any tape hiss could possibly be. Note to whoever thinks they can remaster for CD: First, buy yourself a decent pair of headphones. Then look for something beyond the first freeware program you find that claims to do noise reduction, and learn how to set the parameters so that the result sounds like music."