Search - Paul Jackson Jr :: Power of the String

Power of the String
Paul Jackson Jr
Power of the String
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

This recording starts off with Paul Jackson, a chameleon of a musician, slipping into the increasingly faceless George Benson smooth school of octave guitar playing. Jackson checks into the similar styles of Norman Brown a...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Paul Jackson Jr
Title: Power of the String
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 1
Label: Blue Note Records
Release Date: 3/13/2001
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
Style: Smooth Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 724352147724, 0724352147755, 724352147755, 724521477249

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This recording starts off with Paul Jackson, a chameleon of a musician, slipping into the increasingly faceless George Benson smooth school of octave guitar playing. Jackson checks into the similar styles of Norman Brown and Ronny Jordan on the first two tracks before displaying his own somewhat distinct voice on the third track, the ballad "Pour Noelle," featuring a soulful Boney James on sax. The Power of the String then suddenly makes a sharp turn from smooth jazz onto the R&B road with a funky, radio-friendly version of the Whispers' dance classic, "Rock Steady," complete with clap track. Then comes the beautiful voice of Christian singer and former pop star Deniece Williams on a thinly disguised Jackson hymn, "You Always Satisfy," followed by a rerecording of a tune written by a member of the singing gospel family, the Winans. Jackson sings Marvin Gaye's "Inner City Blues" in surprisingly good voice with members of Take 6. The album ends with a straight-ahead jazz waltz that perhaps only devoted fans of this guitarist or his instrument will have sat through after being faced with such a hodge-podge of styles. --Mark Ruffin

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CD Reviews

I like it, But!!!
Ulysses Slaughter | Charlotte, NC USA | 01/03/2002
(3 out of 5 stars)

"Paul Jackson is a wonderful guitatist. However, Paul has become a victim of the smooth jazz slide toward electronic drums and bass. The drums sound tinny and the bass makes no contribution. Paul has a nice voice, but he trys to hip-hop it. I know the trend in smooth jazz is toward R&B cross-over and I hate it. Money talks I guess. I loved Denise Williams on "You Always Satisfy". I also liked "Rock Steady" from a 'just jamming' perspective, but it wasn't earth shattering. As Doc Powell put it, "don't let the smooth jazz fool you". I will continue to listen to this CD, but I pray that REAL smooth jazz comes back.(with real instruments)"