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There Is No One What Will Take
Palace Brothers
There Is No One What Will Take
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

It sounds as if it were recorded in the back of a barn or on the front porch of a farm in Kentucky with a single microphone to simulate the feel of an old Folkways field recording. The ensemble cast mixes and matches banjo...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Palace Brothers
Title: There Is No One What Will Take
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Drag City
Original Release Date: 6/15/1993
Re-Release Date: 6/7/1993
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
Styles: Americana, Indie & Lo-Fi, Singer-Songwriters
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 036172903429

Synopsis

Amazon.com
It sounds as if it were recorded in the back of a barn or on the front porch of a farm in Kentucky with a single microphone to simulate the feel of an old Folkways field recording. The ensemble cast mixes and matches banjos and poorly strummed acoustic guitars with the occasional synthesizer piercing through the mix. The songs have an odd old-world fascination about them ("Riding," "I Had a Good Father and Mother," "I Tried to Stay Healthy For You") and the singer's delivery is untutored by pitch. --Rob O'Connor

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CD Reviews

Old time music
ensiform | Dallas, TX USA | 03/26/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Oldham tacks a "Brothers" onto the Palace monicker, perhaps intentionally harking back to a time when groups were thus forthrightly named. And indeed, the music this time around is more Bill Monroe than Sonic Youth - there's even a sort of yodel, or a feeble hooting anyway, on "I Had a Good Mother And Father." A more gloomy and daunting track is "Riding," a throwback to the darkest of folk ballads, voices from the grave that tell of incest, abductions and worse. Oldham relies on these old tales and draws deeply from the hillbilly's Pentacostal fear of God. God, sin, prayer, and walking with Jesus are the foundations of the album. "Idle Hands Are the Devil's Playthings" is told as a straightforward morality tale; "(I Was Drunk At the) Pulpit" is a rambling, breathless first-person tale of debauchery though "I knew it was wrong." However, Oldham is not a hick, but has a poet's gift of language. "The sunlight was stronger to my Church-darkwidened eyes," runs an early line in "Pulpit." It aptly encompasses Oldham's struggle with man's baser and nobler urges."
Oh yes,
Mitchell R. King | 12/01/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is good. Simple, honest, and nothing more. Very few people I know truly enjoy this album, most of the time I end up listening to it alone. "I Was Drunk at the Pulpit" proves that one can write a song using only one chord..."
A musical god
Paravak | Earth | 01/15/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Well, well. One can spend a lifetime searching for music like this. If you're ready, this album (and most of his others) will beckon you into a new state of being. Raw and alive, it simply issues from a depth of subtlety few artists even touch."