Search - Otis Rush :: Ain't Enough Comin in

Ain't Enough Comin in
Otis Rush
Ain't Enough Comin in
Genres: Blues, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Otis Rush and Buddy Guy were hot young Chicago guitar slingers in the 1950s, when legends like Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf ruled the Second City. Rush was renowned for his nasty, over-amplified guitar sound, and songs li...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Otis Rush
Title: Ain't Enough Comin in
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Island / Mercury
Original Release Date: 4/5/1994
Release Date: 4/5/1994
Genres: Blues, Pop
Styles: Chicago Blues, Electric Blues, Modern Blues
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 731451876929, 031451876944, 731451876943

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Otis Rush and Buddy Guy were hot young Chicago guitar slingers in the 1950s, when legends like Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf ruled the Second City. Rush was renowned for his nasty, over-amplified guitar sound, and songs like "All Your Love" and "Double Trouble" were seminal touchstones for such `60s British guitarists as Eric Clapton and Peter Green. Rush has lately been known more for live shows than records, and 1994's Ain't Enough Comin' In succeeded because it was programmed like a great concert set, with fat guitar solos that suggested Albert King in a sweat, and songs that drew from both the blues and soul songbooks. Rush sounds great singing Sam Cooke's good-news gospel ("Somebody Have Mercy" and "Ain't That Good News") and pays his propers to Ray Charles on "A Fool for You." Exciting takes on epic tunes associated with B.B. King ("It's My Own Fault") and Albert King ("As the Years Go Passing By") also leave no doubt that Rush hasn't forgotten how to burn down the house. --John Milward

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CD Reviews

A great comeback
Docendo Discimus | Vita scholae | 04/07/2004
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is a really fine album...I just can't give it all five stars, because it isn't quite the equal of Rush's phenomenal late-50s singles.

But judged on its own terms, this is one fine blues record, one of the finest of the 90s, and a worthy addition to Otis Rush's erratic discography. His vocals are still strong and soulful at 60, his Fender Stratocaster sizzles, and he is backed by a fine band which includes former Faces pianist Ian McLagan and the Texacali Horns (Joe Sublett is the tenor saxist).
Okay, so there is a little too much organ for my taste, and not quite enough of Rush's guitar, but perhaps that's just me...I'm an organ-hater, I only like Hammond B-3, preferably played through a Leslie speaker!

This album is about equal parts blues and straight soul tunes, including two songs by Sam Cooke, and Percy Mayfield's "My Jug And I" and Ray Charles' "A Fool For You" are more soul than blues as well.
That may not be to the liking of some fans, who would prefer to hear Otis Rush playing the blues in the gritty fashion of his 1950s Cobra recordings. And it is true that this album doesn't quite have the smouldering intensity of those early singles (partly because of the arrangements), but Rush does come very, very close to recaptureing the old fire with a great rendition of B.B. King's "It's My Own Fault", the sizzling "That Will Never Do", and the fine title track.

The laid-back but muscular R&B-classic "Homework" is another highlight, and the thumping soul stomper "Somebody Have Mercy" shows what a great soul singer Otis Rush is. And he also matches Albert King every step of the way (and perhaps a little further) on "Don't Burn Down The Bridge", and revisits his own "She's A Good 'Un" in an updated version with some riveting guitar playing and a supremely confident vocal performance.

All in all, this is a very, very solid West side blues record with some excellent, tasteful guitar playing, and while Rush's early Cobra sides remain his definitive statement (and the place to start for anybody just getting acquainted with his music), "Ain't Enough Comin' In" is not one to pass up, either. Nobody plays a slow blues guitar solo like Otis Rush."