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Stress: Extinction Agenda
Organized Konfusion
Stress: Extinction Agenda
Genres: Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Before Pharoahe Monch started playing party games, he was working with partner Prince Poetry to put together three of the best albums in hip-hop history. Stress: The Extinction Agenda is the best of this musical triple cro...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Organized Konfusion
Title: Stress: Extinction Agenda
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Hollywood Records
Original Release Date: 1/1/1994
Re-Release Date: 8/16/1994
Album Type: Explicit Lyrics
Genres: Pop, Rap & Hip-Hop, R&B
Styles: East Coast, Pop Rap, Soul
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 720616140623, 720616140616, 720616140647

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Before Pharoahe Monch started playing party games, he was working with partner Prince Poetry to put together three of the best albums in hip-hop history. Stress: The Extinction Agenda is the best of this musical triple crown. Every song has an ace beat that mixes loose, jazzy samples and tightly coiled snares. And every song features two of hip-hop's all-time greatest MCs doing their best work, using their voices like instruments to create performances that are intellectually stimulating and rhythmically bangin'. Pharoahe's verse on "Bring It On" is raw enough to force even the hardest MCs to consider careers as accountants. One warning: Q-Tip's alleged guest appearance on "Let's Organize" consists of him repeating the words "Bounce, let's organize" over and over again with minor variations as the song fades. And it's still a great song. --Joe Schloss

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CD Reviews

This LP is a hip hop classic, hands down.
07/14/1998
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Organized Konfusion's second effort, "Stress," is considered by many to be the most "slept on" album in rap music history. This album redefined lyricism, taking it places it had never before been. Pharoah Monch and Prince Poetry, who comprise O.K., have a message which is both conscious and real. One highlight of "Stress" is Stray Bullet, which is rhymed from the point of view of the bullet itself. Another gem is "Thirteen," where Monch flexes his unparalleled MCing skills. There are few acts out today who ca n match what Monch and Po are doing lyrically. The underground has already taken notice. Now, it is time for some mainstream recognition for these young, talented conscious urban poets. They inject nothing but positivity into an industry desperately in need for some. I recommend this album without any reservation, listing it in my personal top 5 hip hop albums of all time."
Just as good as debut
P. Mcmahon | Dallas | 03/13/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"this album is the answer to people who said the beats werent chunky enough on the celph titled debut it is what defines hip hop today. Forget the 50 cents the eminems the chingys and check out real dope hip hopFavorite Track: Stress and Bring it on and the whole disc!10 of 10 lyrics 10 of 10 beats"
Brilliant
Masir | Atlanta, GA | 12/19/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Its rare that i give an album a five star rating. Partly because my standards are high, but there are also no half-star ratings. That means you really have to draw the line on what is great and what is classic. But in the case of Organized Konfusion's second album, Stress: The Extinction Agenda, I think the five star rating is well deserved. Though not the most enjoyable album ever (at times the production becomes a little too gloomy, even for an underground act), that may be the only noteworthy setback, as it is certainly one of the most complicated records to speak of. That is a good thing too. The album has an intellectual edge that is at times unparalleled in hip-hop. Buy this album and you will be struck by lyricism. The obvious choices on display are Stray Bullet, Thirteen, and Bring it On. But there are others. Pharoahe Monch's now infamous line from Extinction Agenda, "who can you trust when a priest is now the beast", which may be the enduring question of underground laborers. Then there is Keep it Koming and Maintain, where Organized (especially Pharoahe) twist popular phrases and make them uniquely theirs. The aforementioned somber mood becomes movingly justified at the very end of Maintain as Pharoahe offers a subtle tribute to his father, who died during recording, by referencing to him on the last line of the album."