Search - Orbital :: In Sides (Saint)

In Sides (Saint)
Orbital
In Sides (Saint)
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #2

By the time Orbital released its fourth album, the Hartnoll brothers were strongly tipped as techno heavyweights alongside more commercially palatable prospects like Underworld and Prodigy. Yet, instead of catering to the ...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Orbital
Title: In Sides (Saint)
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 1
Label: Rhino / Wea
Release Date: 3/25/1997
Album Type: Original recording reissued
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Pop
Styles: Ambient, Electronica, Techno, Dance Pop
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPC: 643443503129

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
By the time Orbital released its fourth album, the Hartnoll brothers were strongly tipped as techno heavyweights alongside more commercially palatable prospects like Underworld and Prodigy. Yet, instead of catering to the curious, they presented their most self-indulgent album to date with In Sides. Packaging the 24-minute symphonic track "Out There Somewhere?" with the loopy psychedelic flight of "P.E.T.R.O.L.," they created a most unusual and intriguing collection. Despite their best efforts, though, "The Box" still packed the same insistent rhythm that made "Belfast" such an indelible club staple, while a bonus disc featured live versions of "Satan," "Halcyon," and the duo's streamlined themes from The Saint. --Aidin Vaziri

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CD Reviews

The cover art is a fitting gateway into the surreal fun
Torley | torley.com | 09/04/2008
(4 out of 5 stars)

"By this time, the Brothers Hartnoll who make up Orbital had matured to take on serious environmental themes (references to dirty water and solar power abound). Trademarks like reversed female vocals and unconventional sounds alongside more cliched ones (like TR-808 drums) had been refined to high levels, and so onwards, they adventured.

Some of the tracks are still too long for my tastes: they work well if you're zoning out, but if you're paying attention to changes, you'll need to be patient. This is part of why with Orbital, I've generally preferred radio edits over the full mixes, altho I know if you've got the time + space, the extended plays are worth it.

If you like The Box (be sure to seek out the music video if you haven't seen it, it's quite an eye-opener about the state of our planet and contains a modicum of social commentary amidst the dulcimer-laden melodies), be sure to seek out the single which expands on the original themes in a way I wish had been included on this album: things get meatier and beatier for the dance floor, there's allusions to Bach-esque counterpoint, and even a vocal version you'll either love or hate -- I lean towards the latter. An electronic masterpiece."
One of my top ten albums...EVER
J. Guthrie | Texas | 09/18/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I almost despise techno. If fact, I do. I don't have any smarmy philosophies as to why-when I listen to it, I cringe. I guess it brings me back to the time I decided to eat an incredibly powerful sugarcube at a rave headlined by Josh Wink. It wasn't the raver kids, it wasn't because I feel that techno DJs have little to no talent nor was it that I consider neo-hippie douche bag scenesters late 90's fist-magnets...wait, yes it was. It was a time in history best forgotten. Hair gel was your only threat in a world void of Axe Body Spray. The awe inspired by glow-sticks was an expected precursor to a future of regretted tattoos and unrepairable, MDMA-laden brain damage. Techno is perfect for ravers to discuss because there's absolutely nothing to talk about...unless you're deciding which preset dance beat on your MC-505 gets you off more. This angle of the music industry is nothing more than a drug-riddled pyramid scheme helping Guitar Center turn a profit on smoke machines and laser light displays. And wristbands. I am happy to say that now there's at least ten years between us and the late 90's. One thing I am not happy about is associating "In Sides" with this genre of music. It is carefully orchestrated and perfectly executed. I bought this album when I was 13 years old and 13 years later I still jam the first disc at least once every two months. Middle of Nowhere is pretty good, yet The Altogether seems to re-idolize the baggy pants I thought were left in the past. Do yourself a favor and buy this album. No orange juice needed."