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Back Stabbers
O'Jays
Back Stabbers
Genres: Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

Back Stabbers (1972) is the album that put both producing/songwriting team Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff's Philadelphia International label and journeyman trio the O'Jays on the map as major forces in '70s soul. Gamble/Huff's...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: O'Jays
Title: Back Stabbers
Members Wishing: 8
Total Copies: 0
Label: Sbme Special Mkts.
Release Date: 4/29/2008
Genres: Pop, R&B
Style: Soul
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 886972674124

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Back Stabbers (1972) is the album that put both producing/songwriting team Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff's Philadelphia International label and journeyman trio the O'Jays on the map as major forces in '70s soul. Gamble/Huff's lushly funky tracks here proved the ideal backdrop for the group's shared lead vocals; singles like the acid "Back Stabbers" and "992 Arguments" gave free rein to a quality that would lead Wolfman Jack to describe the act as "dangerous." At the same time, "Love Train" offered a more utopian social vision, while ballads such as "Who Am I" and "Listen to the Clock on the Wall" pointed the way to the O'Jays's status as some of R&B's longest-running romantic figures. A key disc for lovers of the Philly sound. --Rickey Wright

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CD Reviews

THE MIGHTY O'JAYS
will power | BELTSVILLE ,MD | 10/22/2007
(5 out of 5 stars)

"ANOTHER GEM FOR THE CD COLLECTOR,TRACK AFTER TRACK OF THE FINEST PHILLY SOUL EVER RECORDED,AS A KID I STOOD WAITING AT THE BUS STOP,BEHIND US WAS A RECORD STORE BLASTING "LOVE TRAIN" WHICH HAD ALL OF US ON THE CORNER DANCING.
PRICELESS MUSIC FROM A SUPER SOUL GROUP...........TIMELESS"
(3.5 stars) Good starter, but the next two are better
finulanu | Here, there, and everywhere | 11/26/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"The group's famous debut, with four charting singles: the title song, paranoid and dramatic; "992 Arguments", solid through its first three minutes but monotonous afterwards, even if the Latin-jazz infusion is a genius arranging touch; the middling slow jam "Sunshine", which does have phenomenal strings; and the anything-but-middling "save-the-world" anthem "Love Train". I find a couple of the album tracks just as good as select hits: "Shiftless, Shady, Jealous Kind of People" is lifted straight from the Whitfield/Strong book, but it's a flattering imitation; "Time to Get Down" is inviting and funky. They lose it completely on the three soap operas, though ("Mr. Lucky"; "Who Am I"; "Listen to the Clock on the Wall"). Still, this and the next record are probably the two best the O'Jays made. So if you have any interest in them, start there."