Search - Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Walter Gieseking :: Mozart: Complete Solo Piano Works [Box Set]

Mozart: Complete Solo Piano Works [Box Set]
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Walter Gieseking
Mozart: Complete Solo Piano Works [Box Set]
Genres: Dance & Electronic, Special Interest, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (20) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #2
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #3
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #4
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #5
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #6
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #7
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #8


      
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CD Reviews

Mozart at his best
erwcpa | McAllen, Texas | 06/17/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"These interpretations of Mozart have been part of my library since I was 14, back in the 70's. Originally issued by Angel in the mid 50's, they were rereleased on Seraphim, which was then the budget label for Angel. Listening to these recordings, one cannot help but notice the attention Gieseking gives to the steady timing. He does not take the liberties that other pianists have been known to take with some music of this era.Is it any wonder that some musical purists consider these interpretations seminal? These CD's are a worthy addition to any classical library (although I can't help but reminisce about the fact that I paid $27.39 for the 11 record set when I bought it almost 30 years ago)."
Full Price for a Boxset of Mono Records That Comes in 8
BLee | HK | 12/15/2005
(3 out of 5 stars)

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There is an Amazon.com review (on Annie Fischer's Complete Beethoven Sonatas) which says Geiseking's Mozart are all "faceless and anonymous". As I don't really know when I will finish listening to them all, I am really in no position to say one way or the other.

After having heard more than half of them, my first impression is, his playing is very disciplined, yet with a lot of grace and style. But contrary to what one may expect, Geiseking could also be surprisingly slow in tempo at times. Yes, he could be poetic too, but he hardly swings. His 511, for instance, could perhaps be a little more poetic. His left hand, perhaps rightly so for Mozart, never thunders. But when the drama of the music requires so, it could be very explosive. Otherwise, his left hand is always at least one step down if not two, be it harmonic or polyphonic...

I don't refer to Geiseking's Mozart that often as I like his Songs Without Words better, and I like his Debussy even more. His Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 is one of the best that one could expect. Finally on the recording. For recording of the 50's with such a label concerning an artist of his stature, I'm afraid the sound quality is somewhat below expectation. All in all, I expect the price of these historic recordings to come down a bit for the benefit of all Mozart lovers.

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