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The Complete Birth of the Cool
Miles Davis
The Complete Birth of the Cool
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (25) - Disc #1

Digitally remastered and expanded definitive edition of the most influential sessions in Modern Jazz! The Complete Birth Of The Cool contains all the original tracks from Birth Of The Cool plus 13 previously unreleased li...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Miles Davis
Title: The Complete Birth of the Cool
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Blue Note Records
Original Release Date: 5/19/1998
Release Date: 5/19/1998
Album Type: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Cool Jazz, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 724349455023

Synopsis

Album Description
Digitally remastered and expanded definitive edition of the most influential sessions in Modern Jazz! The Complete Birth Of The Cool contains all the original tracks from Birth Of The Cool plus 13 previously unreleased live versions of those tracks. The Complete Birth Of The Cool is a landmark collection that simply must be included in any true Jazz aficionado's library. Not only have the original twelve sides by this legendary group been expertly restored, but out-takes and the long awaited live radio cuts from their only real gig have been found and included. Together they form an indispensable documentation of the group that almost single-handedly transformed the Bebop of the '40s into the 'Cool Jazz' that became a West Coast sensation in the early '50s. 29 tracks. Definitive. 2007

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CD Reviews

Cool...Daddio
Mediahound | 03/07/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album is awesome and was the first solo album by Miles Davis(1926-1991). In 1948, Miles left bebop pianeer Charlie Parker to form his own style of jazz and along with Gil Evans(1912-1988) formed a famous nonet featuring the legedary drummer Max Roach. The album was recorded from 1949-1950 but since the jazz audience didn't really "get" this new form in a time when Bebop ruled the jazz clubs and, more importantly, the record sales, the album wasn't released by Capital Records until 1957, after Miles' famous performance at the 1955 Newport Jazz Festival and the release of his 5 classic "first great quintet" recordings(John Coltrane(1926-1967)-Tenor Sax, Red Garland-Piano, Paul Chambers-Bass, and "Philly" Joe Jones(1923-1985) on drums), 4 from Prestige Records-Workin', Steamin', Relaxin', and Cookin' w/ the Miles Davis Quintet, and one from Columbia, the classic 'Round About Midnight. This album is very important in the evolution of modern jazz and this version of the album is made even better with the very rare bootlegged live material from New York's Royal Roost in September, 1948. Unlike the vocal song recorded in 1962 released on the classic second great quintet album, Sorcerer(1967), the vocal on this album is actually sung very well by Kenny Hawgood, I believe, on the song "Darn that Dream." I recommend this album to newcomers and fans of Miles Davis alike, but to those who are just getting into the great world of jazz and consider this one too big a leap, may I suggest the great jazz/fusion trio of recordings(In a Silent Way, Bitches Brew, and Tribute to Jack Johnson) or the second great quintet(Wayne Shorter-tenor sax, Herbie Hancock-piano, Ron Carter-bass, and the late Great Tony Williams(1945-1997) on drums) or if you want the tried and true sextet classic, go straight to the 1959 jazz landmark, Kind of Blue."
Get the single CD instead=better remaster
Mediahound | SF Bay Area, CA United States | 08/18/2009
(3 out of 5 stars)

"The other version of this available on Amazon, single CD is a newer remaster from 2000 instead of 1998. Even though this version includes a 2nd CD of live tracks, if you prefer the best studio recording you can get, I recommend the other one. That's not to say this one is bad though.

Also, this version has talking on the live CD. While that's nice from a historical perspective, it does take you out of the music.

Note this is a mono recording, not stereo."