Search - Felix [1] Mendelssohn, Franz [Vienna] Schubert, Klaus Tennstedt :: Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 "Italian"; Schubert: Symphony No. 9 "Great"

Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 "Italian"; Schubert: Symphony No. 9 "Great"
Felix [1] Mendelssohn, Franz [Vienna] Schubert, Klaus Tennstedt
Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 "Italian"; Schubert: Symphony No. 9 "Great"
Genre: Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1


      
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CD Details

All Artists: Felix [1] Mendelssohn, Franz [Vienna] Schubert, Klaus Tennstedt, Michael Sheady, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
Title: Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 "Italian"; Schubert: Symphony No. 9 "Great"
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: EMI Classics
Original Release Date: 1/1/2008
Re-Release Date: 2/12/2008
Genre: Classical
Style: Symphonies
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 400000004891, 5099950902224
 

CD Reviews

Tennstedt has two great Schubert 9ths to choose from
Santa Fe Listener | Santa Fe, NM USA | 02/19/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Klaus Tennstedt made two Schubert Ninths in 1984, this studio version from Berlin and a live concert version with his own London Phil. released posthumously on BBC Legends. Some reviewers disparage the Berlin account in order to praise the London one, but the truth lies in a statement made by The Gramophone's reviewer: Schubert's "Great C major" is a symphony which cannot be learnt; a conductor either feels it in his bones or he doesn't. Strangely, Karajan was one of those who didn't get it, while Tennstedt most definitely did.

Under his baton, Karajan's Berliners are rougher and more robust -- the trombones tend to blat and the woodwinds are glossy smooth. But this suits Tennstedt's way, which is to bring out the Beethoven in Schubert's writing. More than that, he realizes that such a long, repetitive symphony requires emotional variety to avoid losing focus. He manages superbly, especially in the lengthy Andante, usually prone to tedium but here full of spontaneous change-up in phrasing and tone. The second theme is sublime in its haunting lyrical quality. I think the live reading on BBC is more spontaneous sitll, but it's essential for us Tennstedt lovers to own both.

The Mendelssohn "Italian" Sym. is also with the Berliners. It displays the same warmth and spontaneity as the Schubert, but with the addition of a thrillingly fast finale. In both works the maestro has found the secret of making repetitive music sound fresh each time around."