Search - Martin Carthy :: Out of the Cut

Out of the Cut
Martin Carthy
Out of the Cut
Genres: Folk, World Music, New Age, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

With John Kirkpatrick on accordion and Howard Evans on trumpet liberally sprinkled around this album, it's almost a dress rehearsal for their Brass Monkey group, which the CD immediately precedes. While the mix of instrume...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Martin Carthy
Title: Out of the Cut
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Topic Records
Release Date: 8/9/1994
Genres: Folk, World Music, New Age, Pop
Styles: Traditional Folk, British & Celtic Folk, Celtic, Celtic New Age
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 5016272426023, 011661307513

Synopsis

Amazon.com
With John Kirkpatrick on accordion and Howard Evans on trumpet liberally sprinkled around this album, it's almost a dress rehearsal for their Brass Monkey group, which the CD immediately precedes. While the mix of instruments might seem unlikely, it works in a quintessentially English way, with Carthy's voice and rhythmic guitar playing as the linchpins. The centerpiece songs of this collection ("The Song of the Lower Classes," "Rufford Park Poachers," and "Rigs of the Time") are unabashedly political, and powerful stuff indeed. This is Carthy expanding the possibilities of the seam he's mined, but never forgetting where it all began. "Old Horse" is nothing less than inspiring, and "Jack Rowland," the album's epic, offers magic. This record is all the proof you need of Carthy's vision. --Chris Nickson
 

CD Reviews

England's Charley Patton
Penguin Egg | London, England | 10/10/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Carthy has long been considered the governor of English folk music and this 1982 recording is as good a place to find out why his reputation is so high. The rhythmic drone of his guitar playing and the plaintive, plainspoken style of his singing, create an uncompromising and heartfelt commitment to the traditional songs he performs. This is a million miles away from the singalong-stereotypes of the Spinners-Dubliners-Corries etc. Carthy sings and plays with passion and depth that would not disgrace a 30s Delta blues artist, such as Charley Patton. Whether harrowing (Old Horse) or humorous (Friar in the Well), there is a stark beauty in Carthy's performance that gives full justice to the songs he sings and the lives of the people and culture he celebrates. A wonderful album. The governor of English folk, indeed.

The rest of the musicians are not credited, but John Kirkpatrick appears on accordion, and, unsurprisingly, is excellent. There is also the trumpet playing of Howard Evans which is also excellent. Good stuff, all round.
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