Search - Mandala Band :: Mandalaband

Mandalaband
Mandala Band
Mandalaband
Genres: World Music, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1

The Mandalaband managed to combine excellent musicianship, Eastern religion and annoying subsequent anonymity! The mantra-titled first track, which originally took up all of side one, ranges across several musical styles.

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Mandala Band
Title: Mandalaband
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Edsel Records UK
Release Date: 2/1/1995
Album Type: Import
Genres: World Music, Pop, Rock
Styles: Africa, Progressive, Progressive Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 5014757173431, 766488797022

Synopsis

Album Description
The Mandalaband managed to combine excellent musicianship, Eastern religion and annoying subsequent anonymity! The mantra-titled first track, which originally took up all of side one, ranges across several musical styles.
 

CD Reviews

Early 70's UK light symphonic, with elements of proto-prog
Lethe | Milan, Italy | 02/08/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Well this is a very interesting and original work of the early seventies ('75), still resembling the sound of proto-prog bands such as Cressida and Gracious, nevertheless this album - being characterized also by the strong mellotron parts- makes the sound romantic and quite original (Woolly Wolstenholme, keyboardist for BJH, will make his important contribution to their 2nd effort...yet in my opinion such ensemble is a bit less pop and more interesting than BJH) . The idea which drives this album, based upon the project by David Rohl, author of a TRILOGY inspired by Tolkien, is a sort of musical with unusual melodic hooks for those times and also tasteful orchestral interludes(listen to their following album "The eye of Wendor",regarding a tolkeniesque world within a trilogy,dated 1978).But talking about this debut album, the whole material, written by Rohl, is well represented by the 20-minute piece -divided into four movements-entitled "Om Mani Padme Um", the most symphonic track, with beautiful choirs and expressive guitar lines at the end,even though quite simple.After all the album works very well in this suite;however the other more typical 70's songs: "Roof of the world" and "Song for a king", are memorable pieces of sensible music, sometimes a bit formulaic, but always intense and powerful.
Recommended as a proto-prog version of The Enid!!"
THE undiscoverd gem of orchestral rock
KC | nottingham UK | 08/23/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If you like symphonic orchestral rock which is amazingly over-the-top but brilliant, you'll love this. The main track "Om Mani Padme Hum" is superb. Vocalist David Durant is the most powerful but melodic singer I've heard (where is he now ?). Keyboard player Vic Emerson is the best example you'll hear of someone using string synths (but not mellotrons) to REALLY sound like an orchestra. The rest of the band turned into Sad Cafe - but don't let that put you off. If you like Spring, Gracious, Ange, Mona Lisa, this is like all their best bits with all the weedy soppy bits taken out. The production is good by 1975 standards, the songs, arrangements, and performances make it the most under-rated album of its genre. It's powerful, it's melodic, it's sweeping, but it doesn't have arty-farty complex time signatures or weak vocalists. Buy it. You won't be disappointed."