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Umanamente Uomo: Il Sogno
Lucio Battisti
Umanamente Uomo: Il Sogno
Genres: Folk, World Music, Pop, R&B, Rock, Latin Music
 
  •  Track Listings (8) - Disc #1

Known for for his Ability to Reach the Primal Core of Emotional Matters, Battisti Did Some of his Very Best Songwriting in his Early '70s Collaborations with the Cryptically Named Lyricist Mogol. This 1972 Album, the Title...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Lucio Battisti
Title: Umanamente Uomo: Il Sogno
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Water
Release Date: 10/9/2006
Genres: Folk, World Music, Pop, R&B, Rock, Latin Music
Styles: Europe, Continental Europe, Singer-Songwriters, Euro Pop, Italian Pop, Latin Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 646315717525

Synopsis

Album Details
Known for for his Ability to Reach the Primal Core of Emotional Matters, Battisti Did Some of his Very Best Songwriting in his Early '70s Collaborations with the Cryptically Named Lyricist Mogol. This 1972 Album, the Title of which Translates to "Humanly Man: The Dream," features Battisti's Gorgeous Melodies Wrapped Up in Soft, Warm Orchestral Arrangements. Battisti's Experimental Pop is Worth Discovering on this First Time USA CD Release. Original Artwork and New Detailed Liner Notes.

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CD Reviews

Battisti's orchestral breakthrough
ricciodimare | Tuckahoe, NY USA | 05/23/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

""Umanamente uomo: Il sogno" (Humanly human: The dream) consecrated Battisti at the dawn of the 70's in a dimension superior to his first masterpieces. The arrangements, one of Battisti's sweetest obsessions, sounded finally majestic in this wide breath album. Many of the songs here will be classics of Italian culture. They include the melancholic "I giardini di Marzo" (March gardens), the exciting "Innocenti evasioni" (Innocent escapades) centered on a love affair well rhythmed by a great bass guitar tempo, "E penso a te" (And I think of you) a love monologue suddenly interrupted by an orchestral choir. The album contains other beautiful songs. Two of them deserve attention because "Sognando e risognando" (Dreaming and re-dreaming) has since remained in the world of the underrated gems (its rhythm and choice of chords deserve more attention), and "Il fuoco" (The fire) stands alone almost as an alien in Mr. Battisti's production in a mysterious experimental playing never attempted again. Highly recommended."