Search - Lowell George :: Thanks I'll Eat It Here

Thanks I'll Eat It Here
Lowell George
Thanks I'll Eat It Here
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

Few musicians mirror Los Angeles's tradition of rock chameleons better than Lowell George, son of a Hollywood furrier and the brilliant, short-lived auteur that shaped Little Feat's '70s sound and fury before retreating to...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Lowell George
Title: Thanks I'll Eat It Here
Members Wishing: 11
Total Copies: 0
Label: Warner Bros / Wea
Release Date: 9/14/1993
Genres: Folk, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
Styles: Singer-Songwriters, Blues Rock, Southern Rock, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 075992675529, 603497986606, 759926755296

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Few musicians mirror Los Angeles's tradition of rock chameleons better than Lowell George, son of a Hollywood furrier and the brilliant, short-lived auteur that shaped Little Feat's '70s sound and fury before retreating to allow a more democratic if less gripping chemistry to surface. George's hearty but lyrical, blues-rimmed voice, signature electric slide guitar, and infectious, often surreal songs defined the band--as did his production on their pivotal mid-decade albums, which convinced more than a few listeners that they were Southerners. His 1979 solo album, recorded shortly before his untimely death, mixed new originals ("Honest Man," "Cheek to Cheek," "Himmler's Ring," and the touching "20 Million Things" among them) with smart R&B covers from Allen Toussaint ("What Do You Want the Girl to Do") and Ann Peebles ("I Can't Stand the Rain"), dressed in tight brass choruses and sleek backing choruses, and fit snugly with the Feat canon. --Sam Sutherland

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CD Reviews

A classic -- one of the best Little Feat-related records
Joe Sixpack -- Slipcue.com | ...in Middle America | 11/30/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I guess there are many Little Feat purists who aren't into this album... Their loss, really. I think it's Lowell George's best, most cohesive album, packed with heartfelt (and heartbrreaking) songs such as "20 Million Things To Do" "Find A River" a fine rendition of "Can't Stand The Rain" (which blows Tina Turner's version away) and the irresistible Mexican-flavored "Cheek To Cheek", with a beautiful, full-on mariachi band backing Lowell up on some of his most soaring vocal work. I usually find that even the best Little Feat albums fall apart at some point -- this 'solo' album, however, is much more focused and consistently enjoyable. He had such a great voice and such an infectious sense of fun and humor, all of which comes through loud and clear on this record, with great song after great song. The only bogus tune on it is "Himmler's Ring," but even it sounds easy on the ears. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED... a little-known late-'70s gem."
Exhilarating
KRITTIBAS DASGUPTA | Dubai, UAE | 07/16/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album showcases Lowell George's abilities as a vocalist of real talent and versatility. The arrangements are tight, the slide solos short but incisive. The songs vary between the pure New Orleans style of "What Do You Want The Girl to Do" and the brilliant rocking rendition of "Easy Money". Somewhere along the way, George shows us his introspective side in two gems - " Find a River" and "Twenty Million Things to Do". This is a feel-good album, with a really great musician at his expressive best."
Among my favorites, a showcase of Lowell's vocal talent.
Joe Sixpack -- Slipcue.com | 03/28/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Having first listened to this album in the early 80's as a retrospective of Little Feat's explorations of the southern flavor of jazz-rock, I quickly became enamored with the ease and style that Lowell George brought to his art. The humor and grace found on Thanks, I'll eat it here, found its way into my regular listening rotation first on LP, then cassette, and finally CD. The Little Feat fans I turn on to this recording usually immediately order it for their own. The swing of What Do You Want the Girl to Do? has always served to cheer me up when I attempt to sing along with the trademark arpeggios that Lowell injects. Songs such as Two Trains Running, Can't Stand the Rain, and Easy Money (along with other versions by various artists) serve as a fantastic reference of how musical styles can be interpreted differently by artists. Overall, this album allows the listener to fall into Lowell's ecclectic interpretations, while simply having a fun time listening."