Search - Louis Jordan :: Let The Good Times Roll: The Anthology 1938-1953

Let The Good Times Roll: The Anthology 1938-1953
Louis Jordan
Let The Good Times Roll: The Anthology 1938-1953
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (24) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (22) - Disc #2

The two-disc, 46-cut Good Times does a great job of demonstrating how singer and saxophonist Louis Jordan's music evolved from the fairly straight swing of his early Decca sides to the jump blues that made him a father of ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Louis Jordan
Title: Let The Good Times Roll: The Anthology 1938-1953
Members Wishing: 6
Total Copies: 0
Label: Mca
Original Release Date: 2/23/1999
Release Date: 2/23/1999
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop, R&B
Styles: Regional Blues, East Coast Blues, Jump Blues, Swing Jazz, Vocal Jazz, Vocal Pop, Classic R&B
Number of Discs: 2
SwapaCD Credits: 2
UPCs: 008811190729, 0008811190729

Synopsis

Amazon.com
The two-disc, 46-cut Good Times does a great job of demonstrating how singer and saxophonist Louis Jordan's music evolved from the fairly straight swing of his early Decca sides to the jump blues that made him a father of rock & roll and soul. "Ain't That Just Like a Woman," for instance, features guitarist Carl Hogan giving birth to one of Chuck Berry's signature licks, while the likes of "Beware" and "Choo Choo Ch' Boogie" balance punch and elegance like the work of few bandleaders before or since. It would've been nice to see the mightily syncopated "Early in the Morning" (later covered by both Ray Charles and Harry Nilsson) taking the place of, say, "The Two Little Squirrels," but there really are few complaints to be made about this collection. --Rickey Wright

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CD Reviews

A Monumental Figure in Modern Music ! ! !
Eddie Landsberg | Tokyo, Japan | 02/13/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"In his autobiography, James Brown mentions Louis Jordan as one of his biggest influences, especially the way Louis would go up real high when he'd do that shout on Caldonia, just like Little Richard only when Little Richard was actually LITTLE (as in still in the crib.)I thought it was strange how Ken Burns's JAZZ only gave this monumental figure in modern American music a brief mention but then again, although Jordan did incorporate a lot of Jazz into his playing, and could sing pretty smooth too (I can swear he sounds like Lady Day on Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying) really he created an entirely different art form, one merging everything from the jump blues sounds of Kansas City, with the slick bebop licks of Mintons - - and the influences of all the dance crazes at the time, from Swing to Latin - - and of course, those catchy lyrics which in many ways would end up getting him labeled as a "novelty" act (two of my favorites are What's The Use of Getting Sober and Beware Brother Beware.) From it all, came the musical forms that would eventually be known as R & B, soul, rock and roll and the modern blues. In fact, if you listen to Louis, then early R & B and rock and roll, you hear very little difference... and its no suprize that Louis was singing Let The Good Times Roll long before any white people were doing in on Band Stand - - For this historical reason alone, no true music lover should be without atleast one CD... and this greatly packaged CD is definitely a good place to come.Do not think it possible to understand almost any form of American music, or truly appreciate life, without the presence of Louis Jordan in your player ! ! ! Check out Slim Galliard, and also organists Bill Dogett and Wild Bill Davis (who both did stints with Jordan)..."
Incredible!
Ralph Quirino | Keswick, Ontario Canada | 06/14/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Without the help of former angst/punk-rocker Joe Jackson, many of my generation would never have heard of Louis Jordan. Jackson's JUMPIN' JIVE album was made long before the current swing revival and it exposed many under fortysomethings to the incredible fun, unbridled joy and sheer pop smarts of Jordan at a time when prog-rock was on the wane, disco was just about dead and the new wave was where it was at. But, for far too many years since CDs have been with us, there had been no satisfactory anthology of his biggest, bestest, swingin'-est hits. For years I made do with THE BEST OF LOUIS JORDAN on MCA U.K., a great but not fabulous collection that missed many of the great cuts on this fab double retrospective. Now, MCA's newest anthology, a double, does the man justice thanks to great sound, ALL the key cuts and a decently packaged graphic/booklet treatment. One could rightly make a claim that this is the true start of rock and roll. Jordan was immensely popular during and right after WWII. And though he may have hated rock and roll (and he made no bones about how he felt about it), where would rock be without "Caldonia" or "Choo Choo Ch'Boogie"? This is more than just a historical document, it's a blast from the past that causes heads to nod, feet to shake, hands to get clapped. It's the balls, y'all!"
The True King of R&b -Essential!
Andre M. | Mt. Pleasant, SC United States | 06/29/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"DAMN Chuck Berry! LATER for Little Richard (he could just SHUT UP!) LOUIE JORDAN was the TRUE King of Rock and Roll and R&B! Listen to the wild preaching in "Beans and Cornbread" and try not to roll on the floor laughing. Dig "Open the Door Richard" and I DARE you not to sing along. Try keeping your feet still through "Salt Pork West Virginia" or "Don't Worry Bout That Mule." Trying to find a bad Louis Jordan record is like finding green snow and chicken's teeth! They don't exist!"