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This World Is Not My Home
Lone Justice
This World Is Not My Home
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (17) - Disc #1

This World Is Not My Home weds seven songs from Lone Justice's two albums (issued in 1985 and 1986) with 10 previously unreleased tracks. Of these 10, eight predate the 1985 breakup in which guitarist Ryan Hedgecock, bassi...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Lone Justice
Title: This World Is Not My Home
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Geffen Records
Original Release Date: 1/12/1999
Release Date: 1/12/1999
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock
Styles: Oldies & Retro, Roots Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 720642530429, 0720642530429

Synopsis

Amazon.com
This World Is Not My Home weds seven songs from Lone Justice's two albums (issued in 1985 and 1986) with 10 previously unreleased tracks. Of these 10, eight predate the 1985 breakup in which guitarist Ryan Hedgecock, bassist Marvin Etzioni, and drummer Don Heffington split from lead vocalist Maria McKee. That's a good thing, because the initial lineup easily outshone the too-smooth studio pros who replaced them. Souped-up covers of the traditional "Rattlesnake Mama" and Merle Haggard's "Working Man Blues," both recorded in 1983, lay bare the band's roots in the then-raging Los Angeles punkabilly scene. Etzioni's energetic riffs ricochet off the bedrock rhythm section and McKee's tremulous trill cuts with a gritty edge. But the last third of the disc, including three songs from the lackluster second album and a gimmicky cover of the Velvet Underground's "Sweet Jane" (with guest vocalist Bono) is noticeably weaker. --Anders Smith-Lindall

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CD Reviews

At long last...
02/14/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"For those of us who were blown away by the raw power and exuberance of Maria McKee's voice on the band's first album, this is the first chance since 1985 to really hear her, unleashed and unfettered. Because producers stopped giving her the Michael Jordan treatment (just give her the mike and get out of the way) after the debut, the first seven tracks (from 1983-84) are a long-overdue treat that make this collection worthwhile even for those who already have the original release. The two live tracks are less strong - although Bono's juxtaposition with Maria on "Sweet Jane" is instructive, showing even us rabid U2 fans that compared to her, he can sound awfully pretentious. The version of "Sweet, Sweet Baby" - which admittedly would have trouble topping the bright, soaring studio version - takes on such an opposite tone that it's almost unrecognizable as the same song. But I just listened to it 3 times in a row, so it apparently grows on you..."
Oh, but the good ole days!
Mr. Maxwell C. Mishler | Myrtle Beach, SC | 01/24/1999
(4 out of 5 stars)

"It's nice to every once in a while be transported back to a time when music seemed more raw and felt more real. Even if that time wasn't that long ago. Lone Justice along with bands like The Alarm, early U2 and The Call managed to speak vital truths about spiritual as well as social issues without coming across as preachy. You get the feeling they were just having a blast doing what they did. On "This World Is Not My Home", we get to again feel that innocence and youthfulness that was such a part of it's era. Here's to hoping that Maria Mckee and Co. maybe give us some current material that dares to be that unpretentious."
An Excellent Overview
J. Gemmill | Oreland, PA USA | 02/24/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Here, Maria's sweat flows from this combined best-of/rarities collection as if from her brow, and her heart ... hell, her heart beats like a rhythm section all its own. Check out the live version of "Sweet, Sweet Baby" for one example. For another, skip back to the early demos which lead off the disc ... or the re-mastered version of "Shelter" that seduces you into its groove. Other gems include the Bob Dylan-penned "Go Away Little Boy" (featuring Dylan and Ron Wood on guitars) and an in-concert duet of the Velvet Underground's "Sweet Jane" with U2's Bono. As good and strong as those songs are, it's the band's previously unreleased demos that prove most earth-shattering. The Maria-penned "Drugstore Cowboy," for example, is a shotgun blast of authentic cowpunk-and far, far more. An infectious psychodrama framed in a country twang, it hints at everything to come, both for Lone Justice and Maria on her own."