Search - Linton Kwesi Johnson :: Tings An' Times

Tings An' Times
Linton Kwesi Johnson
Tings An' Times
Genres: World Music, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (7) - Disc #1

Unlike his dub poet peers, Linton Kwesi Johnson (a.k.a. LKJ) understands the resonating dynamics of "less is more." Unvoiced but implied in his anecdotes of black man struggling, the rage, despair, and determination that p...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Linton Kwesi Johnson
Title: Tings An' Times
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Shanachie
Original Release Date: 1/1/1991
Re-Release Date: 4/8/1991
Genres: World Music, Pop
Style: Reggae
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 016351438423

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Unlike his dub poet peers, Linton Kwesi Johnson (a.k.a. LKJ) understands the resonating dynamics of "less is more." Unvoiced but implied in his anecdotes of black man struggling, the rage, despair, and determination that power these seven tracks are all the more searing because the listener is forced to meet the material with his or her own experience and emotion. By this 1991 release, LKJ was a true poet by anyone's standards. Whether read in print or experienced layered into music, his Jamaican patwah poetics had elevated an inherently melodic and rhythmic English language variant in the world's eyes, just as the Dub Band's seamless, shape-shifting instrumentations had ratcheted up the status of reggae. Bouncing doleful, near-deadpan rhymes like he's bandleader Dennis Bovell's partner in bass riddimology, LKJ hits harder and deeper in this than any ranter and raver. --Elena Oumano

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CD Reviews

Heavy dub-style reggae with multi-textured melodies
10/14/1998
(4 out of 5 stars)

"To listen to the music alone, one would expect the lyrics to be something along the lines of love on a beach, birds singing in the spring, and other such sweet nothings. But no, LKJ is a dub poet, which means his leanings are distinctly political and most definitely on the serious tip. Not that you could understand everything he's trying to lay on you through the Jamaican patois, but when you hear the names Ceauscescu and Honeker you know he's not talking about a walk in the park. To listen to the music, though, he might as well be walking through the park with not a care in the world nor a thought heavier than the delicate breeze at his back. It's a weird thing, much like Morrissey, over bouncy Smith's melodies, rapturing about the heavenly nature of being flattened along with his lover (of unknown persuasion, of course) by a double decker bus. But unlike the British, Jamaicans know how to have fun even on the political pulpit (I take that back - If you've ever watched the House of Commons on C-Span, you know the Brits can rip it up white whigs and all, and that the Prime Minister can cap with the best of `em). The rich uplifting sounds of an LBJ production attest to the spirit of the islands, the heavy rolling beats clearing a path for the rollicking frollicking tropical medley of flutes, trumpets, and trombones. The result is an album best taken on a sunny day with a few fruity rum drinks on the side. If you like reggae with the heavy beats - Steel Pulse and Black Uhuru come to mind - and the multitextured melodies of west African world beat music, buy it."