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Leonard Rose: The Memorial Edition
Johann Sebastian Bach, Ernest Bloch, Franz Joseph Haydn
Leonard Rose: The Memorial Edition
Genres: Special Interest, Pop, Classical
 
  •  Track Listings (19) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (26) - Disc #2

An introductory note by Rose's best-known student, Yo-Yo Ma, explains the importance of this collection briefly and accurately: "Leonard Rose was one of the greatest cellists of our time ... he changed the way we think abo...  more »

      
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Amazon.com
An introductory note by Rose's best-known student, Yo-Yo Ma, explains the importance of this collection briefly and accurately: "Leonard Rose was one of the greatest cellists of our time ... he changed the way we think about the cello and raised our standards forever." These two discs add previously unknown material to Rose's already extensive discography, beginning with some Bach dating from 1936 when he was a student at the Curtis Institute and including part of his 1947 Town Hall recital, Bach's unaccompanied Suite No. 3, Brahms's Sonata in F and, best of all, Richard Strauss's Don Quixote (which he never recorded commercially) with George Szell conducting the New York Philharmonic. The booklet includes an autobiographical note. --Joe McLellan
 

CD Reviews

A Glimpse Into the Artist's Craft
John B. Kogut | rockville, md USA | 03/17/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"One of my idols in recordings since my earliest cellistic days, what a treat to be able to hear him in pieces otherwise unrecorded, and to even be privy to practice sessions! In one of them you can even hear him emit an expletive when annoyed at himself! This is a gem, a true collector's item for the cognoscenti."
Early works unveiled
Chi-Chi | Japan | 04/05/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"What's so interesting about this 2-CD set is that it contains great cellist Leonard Rose's early playing--from the time when he was a student at Curtis Institute. People who already have other Rose's CDs will enjoy listening his music when he was a teenager. Since many of the pieces on the CDs, in the 1930s and 40s, were recorded for radio broadcasting, I have to admit that the sound quality is not superb. But, in spite of that, there are so much more in this CD set to explore Rose's music. The one small funny stuff is that, in the final piece, the producer put a very rare-to-hear, practice by Rose, which might encourage young cello students to head for more practice. After listening this 2 CDs, I felt like I can get a little closer to Rose in person."