Search - Lee Morgan :: Live at the Lighthouse

Live at the Lighthouse
Lee Morgan
Live at the Lighthouse
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #2
  •  Track Listings (4) - Disc #3

This double LP, which was trumpeter Lee Morgan's next-to-last recording, contains four lengthy side-long explorations by the trumpeter's regular quintet of the period (with Bennie Maupin on tenor, flute and bass clarinet, ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Lee Morgan
Title: Live at the Lighthouse
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Blue Note Records
Original Release Date: 5/9/1996
Re-Release Date: 4/30/1996
Album Type: Box set, Live
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Avant Garde & Free Jazz, Soul-Jazz & Boogaloo, Bebop
Number of Discs: 3
SwapaCD Credits: 3
UPCs: 724383522828, 724383522859, 758661385027, 24383522859 0

Synopsis

Album Description
This double LP, which was trumpeter Lee Morgan's next-to-last recording, contains four lengthy side-long explorations by the trumpeter's regular quintet of the period (with Bennie Maupin on tenor, flute and bass clarinet, pianist Harold Mabern, bassist Jymie Merritt and drummer Mickey Roker). The music is very modal-oriented and probably disappointed many of Morgan's longtime fans but he had gotten tired of playing the same hard bop-styled music that he had excelled at during the past decade and was searching for newer sounds. The influence of the avant-garde and early fusion is also felt in spots but the trumpeter's sound was still very much intact and he takes some fiery solos that still sound lively decades later. Players Include:
Lee Morgan (trumpet)
Bennie Maupin (flute, tenor saxophone)
Harold Mabern (piano)
Jymie Merritt (bass)
Mickey Roker (drums)
Jack DeJohnette (drums)
 

CD Reviews

Lee Lightin' Up The Lighthouse
kizman76 | Santa Monica, California United States | 02/02/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This is by far one of the better jazz albums ever assembled. If you're a fan of Lee's "Rumproller" and "Cornbread" albums, you will love this one. The groove of these live performance couldn't be generated in a studio. This isn't just Lee Morgan's music, this is his soul poured on this album."
Great Late Lee
Michael B. Richman | Portland, Maine USA | 09/23/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Lee Morgan's "Live At The Lighthouse" is great look at the master trumpeter in the year before his tragic murder at the hands of his common-law wife. Originally released as a posthumous double LP, this is the kind of release we were all promised with the advent of the compact disc! Three discs packed full with more than an hour of music each, half of the songs previously unreleased, and improved, remastered sound. Joining Lee on this voluminous set are Bennie Maupin (on tenor sax, bass clarinet and flute), Harold Mabern (on piano), Jymie Merritt (on bass) and Mickey Roker (on drums, with Jack DeJohnette replacing him on a few tracks). The material covered on these discs is typical, classic late Lee. Always the tireless innovator, he only returned to two of his mid 60s Blue Note hits, "The Sidewinder" and "Speedball." The rest of the tunes are new, and exemplify the modern innovations and directions Lee was taking his music in the new decade of the 70s. Along with "The Last Session" and Larry Young's "Mother Ship" (currently unavailable on CD), "Live At The Lighthouse" paints the final portrait of a jazz great taken from this world all to soon."
Good on vinyl; better and complete on CD
R G-S | Los Angeles, CA United States | 12/31/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The music on this album, even in its LP version, was the sort that made West Coast listeners wonder why "East Coast guys" seemed to play so much HARDER than other folks recorded at the same venue.

Lee was at the top of his post-Messengers form, and Maupin's work is among his best, even looking back from today, thirty-five years later. The rhythm section cooks, and Blue Note did NOT edit the songs down into "pop" length, even on the double LP.

There's a marvelous slow piece, "Neophilia" ("love of the new") featuring Lee's rarely heard and gorgeous fleugelhorn and Maupin's bass clarinet, rarely heard outside of his Davis/Hancock dates. (Why isn't this tune a standard by now?!?) and Lee's uptempo "soul-jazz" standards (added to the box set) including one on which an eager Jack DeJohnette guests on drums, champing at the bit. HARD post-bop lived!

Sad to think, these many years later, what else Morgan, and this band might have gone on to do....

rfgs"