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The Eiger Sanction: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
John Williams
The Eiger Sanction: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Genre: Soundtracks
 
  •  Track Listings (13) - Disc #1

Released the same year as John Williams's Oscar-winning score for Jaws, The Eiger Sanction is a fine example of his true range and impressive malleability as a composer. In fact, those unfamiliar with this work may find it...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: John Williams
Title: The Eiger Sanction: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
Members Wishing: 4
Total Copies: 0
Label: Varese Sarabande
Original Release Date: 5/21/1975
Re-Release Date: 2/19/1991
Album Type: Soundtrack
Genre: Soundtracks
Style:
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 030206527728, 030206527742

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
Released the same year as John Williams's Oscar-winning score for Jaws, The Eiger Sanction is a fine example of his true range and impressive malleability as a composer. In fact, those unfamiliar with this work may find its main title and other cues bear striking similarities to the early '70s canon of one Ennio Morricone. Perhaps inspired by director-star Clint Eastwood's deep musical passions, Williams's modernistic score fuses cool jazz with symphonic overtones, creating a sophisticated pop concerto in the same select league as Michel Legrand's The Thomas Crown Affair. A largely unheralded musical gem that's aged much better than the film it was written for, Williams's score for The Eiger Sanction could also be read as prime proto-'90s cocktail-set music; with or without the martinis, it's a cooly sophisticated delight. --Jerry McCulley
 

CD Reviews

A number of musical styles put together in perfect harmony
12/04/1998
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Williams uses his musical gift and ability to catch the atmosphere of jazz, pop and classical music in a truely artistic way. The musical form being that of the variation uses a theme of french reconaissance and turns it into a perfectly synthesised "era" music, each reflecting its own genre. It should more be considered a work of its own, standing aside from most soundtracks by being completely free from theatrical and cheap imitations. This music is the work of true inspiration and ingenuity, by a craftsman who have accomplished above expectations and contributed to making filmscores an art of its own."
Williams Meets Eastwood
Luis M. Ramos | Caracas, Venezuela | 05/26/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"One interesting thing about this CD is that you can find almost all styles of music, all of which were created By John Williams for this Clint Eastwood actioner.The main theme for "The Eiger Sanction" is lyrically beautiful, but I find a little tiresome that it's repeated in different tracks of this CD. However, I may say that the best versions are heard on the first two tracks and track # 6."The Icy Ascent" is my favorite track because it represents the pre-Star Wars Williams in a way. The melody begins calmly and then goes in crescendo until reaching a spectacular moment. Just like climbing a mountain. But if we go on talking about classical motifs, "The Top Of The World" and "The Eiger" make a fine complement to "The Icy Ascent"."The Eiger Sanction" is a fine work by Williams, and the only one written for a Clint Eastwood movie. I would have loved to have seen, or whatever, Williams write the scores for "Firefox" and "Space Cowboys". Too bad."
A rare and unique side of Williams-Before The Epics!
Jonathan Little | 01/25/1999
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Just a few years after writing quirky TV themes (Lost In Space) and a few years BEFORE he single-handedly re-invented motion picture scoring (STAR WARS; SUPERMAN, etc,)Williams scored this espionage yarn for star/director Clint Eastwood. Although the film itself has dated badly, the music, like so much of Williams' work, transcends the material it was written for and emerges as a unique entry in his repertoire. Most of his subsequent works have, of course, demanded a more powerful evocation of mood, but this early score is indicative of Williams' lighter touch. "Friends and Enemies" and "Theme...Hemlock and Jemima", are intimate moments that are contrasted effectively with things like "The Icy Ascent" and "The Eiger." Barely released twenty years ago, this score is a welcome addition to any John Williams library, and perhaps even more so now that it is more "removed" from the film itself."