Search - John McLaughlin :: Devotion

Devotion
John McLaughlin
Devotion
Genre: Jazz
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

Dutch budget compilation for the acclaimed guitarist who led the Mahavishnu Orchestra. Six tracks including, 'Marbles', 'Siren' & 'Don't Let The Dragon Eat Your Mother'. 2000 release.

      
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CD Details

All Artists: John McLaughlin
Title: Devotion
Members Wishing: 6
Total Copies: 0
Label: Mpg Uk/Zoom
Release Date: 1/6/2009
Album Type: Import
Genre: Jazz
Styles: Jazz Fusion, Modern Postbebop, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
Dutch budget compilation for the acclaimed guitarist who led the Mahavishnu Orchestra. Six tracks including, 'Marbles', 'Siren' & 'Don't Let The Dragon Eat Your Mother'. 2000 release.

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CD Reviews

1969 Jazz-Rock, Blues Trailblazing
Keith N. Moore | S.F. CA | 09/06/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This music is very important in that it is a continuation along the trail blazed by Jimi Hendrix (Electric Ladyland and the Band of Gypsys ), The Cream (Wheels of Fire), Miles Davis (Miles in the Sky, In a Silent Way and Bitches Brew) and The Tony Williams Lifetime (Emergency and Turn it Over the latter recording included drummer Tony Williams, John McLaughlin , Larry Young (Khalid Yasin) and bassist Jack Bruce).

John McLaughlin began this journey jamming with Graham Bond, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker with the Graham Bond Organization back in 1964 in London blues clubs, when the world was intensly focused on the Beatles and "I Want to Hold Your Hand" music.
As we fast-forward 5 years to 1969, New York City, John has been initiated into the Miles Davis Directions movement with The Tony Williams Lifetime being his main focus for his evolving musical talents. Jimi Hendrix was also in New York successfully taking the electric guitar far beyond traditional rock borders, and John, with the music of Devotion, is attempting to tap this base and create one of his own. Guitarist Eric Clapton and the Cream in 1968 were also expanding the boundaries of rock and blues jamming as can be clearly heard on the recording "Wheels of Fire" on the portions that were recorded live at the Fillmore.

Devotion is the crucial mix of a Jazz-Rock, Blues guitarist, a Jazz keyboardist, a Blues/Rock drummer (very similar to Ginger Baker), and a Rock/Blues Bassist with slight overtones of the Beatles. I know, that all sounds way, way-out but that's what this music is, a true Jazz-Rock-Blues fusion mix. This fusion mix is one of the very first outside of the Tony Williams Lifetime which included John and Larry. Also heard on Devotion are Buddy Miles and Billy Rich who both jammed and recorded with Jimi Hendrix. Buddy Miles was also appearing live with Jimi Hendrix and Billy Cox in the Band of Gypsys when this music was recorded.

John's guitar playing at the top of this music is just superb. The interplay between all musicians is clearly heard here as both John and Larry clocked many hours together with the Tony Williams Lifetime and Miles Davis and clearly have a musical and spiritual feel for one and other. Buddy and Billy also have great feel for each other after playing and recording in the the Buddy Miles Express and later jamming and recording with Jimi Hendrix. In the case of Billy Rich, it was recommended that he and not Billy Cox replace Noel Redding in the Jimi Hendrix Band, but due to a past friendship with Jimi, Billy Cox won out.
The three compositions which I feel define this production are "Devotion", "The Dragon Song" and "Purpose of When." Take the time to listen and you too will hear the expanded Rock, Blues, and Jazz improvisations (with no vocals) and the lack of traditional Rock/blues musical confinement that these four musicians experience as they blaze this unchartered trail. As you listen, remember that at the time of this release The Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Band of Gypsys, and the Cream have all disbanded, and no Mahavishnu Orchestra, Chick Corea & Return to Forever, Jeff Beck & Jan Hammer Band, Terje Rypdal Band, or Soft Machine with Allan Holdsworth exist yet.

John told me personally that he "did not like the production aspect of this recording" and he "did not recognize the post production recording." Buddy stated he also did not care for the recording for different reasons. This is the confusing aspect to all this as I feel the recording and post recording remix as a whole make this music exactly what it is, one unique, great recording. Alan Douglas and Stefan Bright colored the sound with great success just as Jimi Hendrix and the Beatles (with George Martin) both worked wonders with the post recording remixes. I feel one of the issues here is John, being a straight ahead Jazz/Blues musician was just not accustomed to unseen expanded mixing techniques used here in the States and in England to create a larger presentation of a musical production to appeal to a larger audience. I have owned this music since 1970 and still enjoy it 35 years later. Check it out!"
1969 Jazz-Rock, Blues Trailblazing
Keith N. Moore | S.F. CA | 09/06/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"First, purchase this 1992 Restless/Metrotone Original CD release from the original studio Master Tape from the 1969-1970 Alan Douglas, Stefan Bright production and not the current Original Recording Remastered release which is remastered from a vinyl record.
This music is very important in that it is a continuation along the trail blazed by Jimi Hendrix (Electric Ladyland and the Band of Gypsys ), The Cream (Wheels of Fire), Miles Davis (Miles in the Sky, In a Silent Way and Bitches Brew) and The Tony Williams Lifetime (Emergency and Turn it Over the latter recording included drummer Tony Williams, John McLaughlin , Larry Young (Khalid Yasin) and bassist Jack Bruce).

John McLaughlin began this journey jamming with Graham Bond, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker with the Graham Bond Organization back in 1964 in London blues clubs, when the world was intensly focused on the Beatles and "I Want to Hold Your Hand" music.
As we fast-forward 5 years to 1969, New York City, John has been initiated into the Miles Davis Directions movement with The Tony Williams Lifetime being his main focus for his evolving musical talents. Jimi Hendrix was also in New York successfully taking the electric guitar far beyond traditional rock borders, and John, with the music of Devotion, is attempting to tap this base and create one of his own. Guitarist Eric Clapton and the Cream in 1968 were also expanding the boundaries of rock and blues jamming as can be clearly heard on the recording "Wheels of Fire" on the portions that were recorded live at the Fillmore.

Devotion is the crucial mix of a Jazz-Rock, Blues guitarist, a Jazz keyboardist, a Blues/Rock drummer (very similar to Ginger Baker), and a Rock/Blues Bassist with slight overtones of the Beatles. I know, that all sounds way, way-out but that's what this music is, a true Jazz-Rock-Blues fusion mix. This fusion mix is one of the very first outside of the Tony Williams Lifetime which included John and Larry. Also heard on Devotion are Buddy Miles and Billy Rich who both jammed and recorded with Jimi Hendrix. Buddy Miles was also appearing live with Jimi Hendrix and Billy Cox in the Band of Gypsys when this music was recorded.

John's guitar playing at the top of this music is just superb. The interplay between all musicians is clearly heard here as both John and Larry clocked many hours together with the Tony Williams Lifetime and Miles Davis and clearly have a musical and spiritual feel for one and other. Buddy and Billy also have great feel for each other after playing and recording in the the Buddy Miles Express and later jamming and recording with Jimi Hendrix. In the case of Billy Rich, it was recommended that he and not Billy Cox replace Noel Redding in the Jimi Hendrix Band, but due to a past friendship with Jimi, Billy Cox won out.
The three compositions which I feel define this production are "Devotion", "The Dragon Song" and "Purpose of When." Take the time to listen and you too will hear the expanded Rock, Blues, and Jazz improvisations (with no vocals) and the lack of traditional Rock/blues musical confinement that these four musicians experience as they blaze this unchartered trail. As you listen, remember that at the time of this release The Jimi Hendrix Experience, The Band of Gypsys, and the Cream have all disbanded, and no Mahavishnu Orchestra, Chick Corea & Return to Forever, Jeff Beck & Jan Hammer Band, Terje Rypdal Band, or Soft Machine with Allan Holdsworth exist yet.

John told me personally that he "did not like the production aspect of this recording" and he "did not recognize the post production recording." Buddy stated he also did not care for the recording for different reasons. This is the confusing aspect to all this as I feel the recording and post recording remix as a whole make this music exactly what it is, one unique, great recording. Alan Douglas and Stefan Bright colored the sound with great success just as Jimi Hendrix and the Beatles (with George Martin) both worked wonders with the post recording remixes. I feel one of the issues here is John, being a straight ahead Jazz/Blues musician was just not accustomed to unseen expanded mixing techniques used here in the States and in England to create a larger presentation of a musical production to appeal to a larger audience. I have owned this music since 1970 and still enjoy it 35 years later. Check it out!"
Raw, gritty fusion - 4 1/2 stars
littlewing | Mumbai India | 10/28/2007
(4 out of 5 stars)

"John Mclaughlin's closest brush with straight ahead hard rock. This features fellow 'Lifetimer' Larry Young on Organ and Hendrix's Band of Gypsies as the rhythm section.

The sound is influenced by Hendrix, with the use of heavy distortion and wah wah processing. Mclaughlin and Young's interplay is superb throughout. This is not for persons looking for melody - with atonal harmonies and angular jams. Producer Alan Douglas deliberately makes the sound gritty to veer it closer to rock.

An interesting and important document from the early days of fusion."