Search - John Lee Hooker :: Plays & Sings the Blues

Plays & Sings the Blues
John Lee Hooker
Plays & Sings the Blues
Genres: Country, Blues, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

Like other recordings from Hooker's early studio sessions, these tunes bristle with driving energy and ripple with the power of his shouted declarations. This is back porch music from the heart of the Delta, jolted to larg...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: John Lee Hooker
Title: Plays & Sings the Blues
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Mca
Release Date: 7/26/1989
Genres: Country, Blues, Pop
Styles: Classic Country, Contemporary Blues, Delta Blues, Traditional Blues, Regional Blues, Detroit Blues, Electric Blues, Acoustic Blues
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 076732919927, 0076732919927, 076732919910, 076732919941

Synopsis

Amazon.com essential recording
Like other recordings from Hooker's early studio sessions, these tunes bristle with driving energy and ripple with the power of his shouted declarations. This is back porch music from the heart of the Delta, jolted to larger-than-life proportions by the electricity powering Hooker's guitar and by his own strong desire to quit sweeping factories and begin cleaning up on the charts. Although he often reworked themes by earlier bluesmen during this period, it was rare that Hooker outright covered another artist's material. So his riveting interpretations of Muddy Waters's "Please Don't Go" and Big Maceo Merriweather's "Worried Life Blues" peak this collection of solo turns that were recorded for Chess in 1951 and '52. --Ted Drozdowski

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CD Reviews

Straight up, unfiltered, 100% pure blues
Nathan Alderman | Washington, DC | 10/15/2001
(4 out of 5 stars)

"With little more than the steady stomp of his foot, the virtuosic hum of his guitar, and his famously murky voice, John Lee Hooker makes blues magic. These are wry, witty, beautifully simple songs, and if you don't find your foot tapping in time to the rhythm at least once, you haven't been paying attention.
Considering these songs were recorded 50 years ago, the sound is remarkable pristine and pure, with the exception of the disc's liveliest tune, the pleasantly scratchy "Mad Man Blues," and "Hey Boogie." There's at least one odd hiccup-- track 8, "Lonely Boy Boogie", ends abruptly in mid-song-- but otherwise, this is a satisfying and soulful disc for those in need of a blues fix."