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John Hiatt - Greatest Hits: The A&M Years '87-'94
John Hiatt
John Hiatt - Greatest Hits: The A&M Years '87-'94
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
 
  •  Track Listings (18) - Disc #1

Unlike Capitol's 1998 release, The Best of John Hiatt, which contained several inferior re-recordings of older tunes, this Hiatt best-of contains the original versions of most of his best-known tunes. The 18-track collecti...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: John Hiatt
Title: John Hiatt - Greatest Hits: The A&M Years '87-'94
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: A&M
Original Release Date: 1/1/1999
Re-Release Date: 11/2/1999
Genres: Country, Alternative Rock, Folk, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock
Styles: Americana, Singer-Songwriters, Singer-Songwriters, Country Rock
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 731454092920, 731454092944, 0731454092920

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Unlike Capitol's 1998 release, The Best of John Hiatt, which contained several inferior re-recordings of older tunes, this Hiatt best-of contains the original versions of most of his best-known tunes. The 18-track collection contains healthy dollops of 1987's Bring the Family (with Nick Lowe, Ry Cooder, and Jim Keltner) and 1988's Slow Turning, including "Memphis in the Meantime," "Thing Called Love," "Drive South," and "Tennessee Plates." It's filled out with material from the more recent Stolen Moments ("Real Fine Love") and Perfectly Good Guitar (the title track and "Buffalo River Home"). Mercifully, only one track ("Angel Eyes") is culled from his goofy live album, Hiatt Comes Alive at Budokan?. Hiatt's hound-dog voice and his ability to attract superior players adds luster, but it's the gems from his knockout songwriting run from the late '80s and early '90s that make this an essential disc, particularly for those who don't own the individual albums. --Robert Baird

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CD Reviews

Superb Collection of a Gifted Singer-Songwriter
Steve Vrana | Aurora, NE | 04/15/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"If the song list on Greatest Hits looks familiar to longtime John Hiatt fans, it's because it virtually duplicates his 1994 live album. However, this studio best of is the better representation of this gifted singer-songwriter than the less polished arrangements found on Hiatt Comes Alive at Budokan? Culled mostly from his four studio albums for A&M--Bring the Family, Slow Turning, Stolen Moments and Perfectly Good Guitar--this collection brings together on one disc most of his finest moments.To the general public Hiatt may be known primarily as a songwriter, since many of these songs have been covered by other artists: "Thing Called Love" (Bonnie Raitt), "Through Your Hands" (David Crosby), "Feels Like Rain" (Maria Muldaur, Aaron Neville), "Tennessee Plates" (Mark Collie), "Rest of the Dream" (Nitty Gritty Dirt Band), "Have a Little Faith in Me" (Joe Cocker, Delbert McClinton) and "Angel Eyes" (Jeff Healey). But those cover versions have nothing on Hiatt's own. Even Hiatt's live version of "Angel Eyes" provides a heartfelt interpretation.In addition to being an excellent songwriter, he is a more than proficent guitar player and posseses one of the most distinctive voices in popular music. Standout tracks include everything from Bring the Family ("Memphis in the Meantime," "Thing Called Love," Thank You Girl," et. al.) where he was backed by drummer extaordinaire Jim Keltner along with bassist Nick Lowe and Ry Cooder on guitar.While each of the four studio albums that this CD draws from would be a welcome addition to any John Hiatt fan's collection, this is an excellent place to start. But be forewarned: You will eventually want to buy the entire albums. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED"
Don't let the hype scare you
David G. Smith | Fairfax, CA United States | 08/27/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I normally let hype scare me. When people rave on about songwriters like Hiatt I tend to get a little worried. If you are in my camp on this, let me assure you that John Hiatt is the real thing. This compilation is of course a mere sampler of the work Hiatt has done but again they are songs with sound and substance. Hiatt writes your wonderful ballad about ache and loss, those ridiculous decisions we make(Lipstick Sunset),and these are certainly heart on the sleeve renderings of the human condition. What puts John Hiatt in a class by himself is probably what takes him away from the amazingly popular gold record realm, and that is that he writes about love gone right, not just love but marital love, with kids. Hiatt puts down a welcome mat to a world of babies, wives, former ghosts and abuses, and is never afraid to expose himself on his journey flavored with folk, country, blues, and stadium rock. Finally, I would suggest if you have never heard John Hiatt, pull up a chair and listen to the lyrics, full of humor(rhyming ameoba and queen of sheba) and lovely images (the aforementioned Lpstick Sunset). A warning to you, these are songs that appeal to the humanity in our journeys. Some rock pretty well(Hiatt really rocks in concert by the way), but they are about things, about our lives as human beings...trying to love and exist in a beautiful and flawed world.... (and I suggest you listen to my favorite... Buffalo River Home...to get a sense of my taste.) I don't think you'll be sorry."
Coincides with Hiatt's best period
Brian D. Rubendall | Oakton, VA | 12/23/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"John Hiatt has always been a maddeningly inconsistent songwriter. He was once tagged with the "Next Dylan" label and had a disappointing career until his "Bring the Family" album in 1987. Starting with that record, he released a run of laid back country-rock albums including "Slow Turning," "Stolen Moments" and "Perfectly Good Guitar" that marked the high point of his career both commercially and artistically. The "A&M Years" collects the best songs from this period all on one disc. The best of the best include "Slow Turning," "Thing Called Love" (later covered by Bonnie Raitt) "Real Fine Love," "Drive South" and "Child of the Wild Blue Yonder." Hiatt is a good singer, a decent songwriter and a fair storyteller. His style is reminiscent of a more country-ish and less arrogant (fellow Hoosier) John Cougar Mellencamp. This collection is the perfect set of his songs for the casual fan."