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Live At The Village Vanguard: The Master Takes
John Coltrane
Live At The Village Vanguard: The Master Takes
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (5) - Disc #1

John Coltrane's legendary 1961 stint at the Village Vanguard marked one of many watersheds in his career. For the first time on record, Coltrane was delving into extended solos, featuring another saxophonist in his front l...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: John Coltrane
Title: Live At The Village Vanguard: The Master Takes
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Grp Records
Release Date: 2/24/1998
Album Type: Extra tracks, Original recording reissued, Live
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Styles: Avant Garde & Free Jazz, Modern Postbebop, Bebop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 011105025126, 0011105125123, 011105125123, 076741913626

Synopsis

Amazon.com
John Coltrane's legendary 1961 stint at the Village Vanguard marked one of many watersheds in his career. For the first time on record, Coltrane was delving into extended solos, featuring another saxophonist in his front line and extending the rhythmic palette of his group to include East Indian tinges. Eric Dolphy stands out in the Village Vanguard sessions, both for his poingnant bass clarinet work on "India" and for his dragon-like alto sax elsewhere. As usual with the "classic" Coltrane Quartet, pianist McCoy Tyner and drummer Elvin Jones create a storm of crisp chords and torrential rhythms. This creates an ideal foil for Coltrane's irrepressible saxophone creativity. Andrew Bartlett

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CD Reviews

One of the Top Coltrane CD's
nadav haber | jerusalem Israel | 02/27/2002
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Coltrane's music was constantly changing and developing, but it can be divided into 3 main periods - the hard bop period (up to 1960) the modal period (up to 1965) and the atonal period - the last two years of his life.
I love the second period most, and this CD is my favorite. The musicians feed off each other, and the combination of Coltrane and Dolphy is exhilirating. Dolphy's enterance on his "India" solo is just so beautiful... Both he and Coltrane are so attuned - you hear how they pick up where the other has left, and they feed off Tyner and Jones and build magnificent musical structures.
Overall, the energy level, the musical ideas, the positive vibration - all make for an amazing album. personally - I rate this CD higher than A Love Supreme and Giant Steps.
If you want to know Coltrane - you may start here. If you are a Coltrane fan - this is an invaluable addition to your collection."
It's not called "the Master Takes" for nothing!
R. Hutchinson | a world ruled by fossil fuels and fossil minds | 02/03/2001
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Coltrane's stand at the Village Vanguard in 1961 caused an uproar at the time. Coming on the heels of Ornette Coleman at the Five Spot in 1959, this new music had the jazz old guard up in arms -- they called it "anti-jazz"! What was Coltrane doing, they asked, after the sublime perfection of KIND OF BLUE and GIANT STEPS? If Wynton Marsalis had been there, I'm sure he would have agreed. But listen for yourself! This is beautiful, unearthly music -- "Spiritual" and "India" take the Eastern modal direction Coltrane explored with "My Favorite Things" even further. "Chasin' the Trane," of course is a tenor tour de force that still has the power to amaze. And after a less than promising beginning on the standard "Softly As a Morning Sunrise," Trane launches off into an incredible, twisting soprano solo.

The band is stellar -- the great rhythm section of Elvin Jones, Reggie Workman (and/or Jimmie Garrison) and McCoy Tyner, and Eric Dolphy on bass clarinet. And here's a consideration to keep in mind -- this particular record, called THE MASTER TAKES, collects everything from the live dates that John Coltrane authorized for release during his life. I'm not saying the COMPLETE SESSIONS are sub-par, that's not the point. The point is that this record, with all the live tracks from the original Impulse LPs LIVE AT THE VILLAGE VANGUARD and IMPRESSIONS has its own integrity. If you are sufficiently knocked out and have the discretionary income, you can always spring for the 4-disc COMPLETE later!

This is truly one of those recordings that deserves more than 5 stars."
An evergreen classic
Peter Baklava | Charles City, Iowa | 06/11/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Listeners unfamiliar with the Coltrane catalogue could do worse than to begin with this gem, which features the 'classic quartet' supplemented by multi-instrumentalist Eric Dolphy.

Track by track:
"Spiritual": One of the most beautiful of Coltrane themes. It opens with majestic fanfare, then moves into a syncopated waltz time. Coltrane starts on tenor, finishes on soprano sax. McCoy Tyner's piano underpinnings imbue this work with a cleansing grace, like urban rain washing away the city grime.

"Softly As In A Morning Sunrise": A quick stroll through the park, with Elvin Jones shining on both brushes and sticks. Tyner has a typically sparkling solo, ushering in Coltrane on soprano sax.

"Chasing The Trane": Almost a power trio. Coltrane on tenor, never letting up, and never repeating himself. He does everything but turn his horn inside out. The rock group "Cream" was never quite this intense.

"India": An unusual theme that sounds to me more American Indian than Far Eastern. Coltrane's soprano sax takes on a skirling, keening quality, sometimes erupting into furious squalls.

"Impressions": Another marathon in which Coltrane leaps between straightforward lyricism and Ornette Coleman style free jazz. Elvin Jones pounds away and prods throughout."