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Roots to Branches
Jethro Tull
Roots to Branches
Genres: Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

Remastered edition of this 1995 album. Whereas in the 1980s Jethro Tull had dabbled in heavy metal and modern rock, Roots To Branches hearkens back to the classic Tull sound, with a lot more flute, making it one of the ban...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Jethro Tull
Title: Roots to Branches
Members Wishing: 2
Total Copies: 0
Label: Capitol
Original Release Date: 1/1/2007
Re-Release Date: 10/31/2006
Album Type: Original recording remastered
Genres: Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
Styles: Progressive, Progressive Rock, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 094637101926

Synopsis

Album Description
Remastered edition of this 1995 album. Whereas in the 1980s Jethro Tull had dabbled in heavy metal and modern rock, Roots To Branches hearkens back to the classic Tull sound, with a lot more flute, making it one of the band's more vintage-sounding offerings during their later era. Features ''At Last, Forever'', ''Dangerous Veils'' and more.

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CD Reviews

Putting down deep roots
Tim Brough | Springfield, PA United States | 10/29/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Ian Anderson has always seemed older than his years, from the Man V God introspection of Aqualung to being one of the first major bands to embrace folkier elements (even during the rise of punk-rock) with Songs from the Wood, so it is no surprise that their later music has aged as well as their earlier classics. "Roots To Branches," Tull's final album in their multi-decade tenure on Chrysalis records, is one of the band's best 90's albums, in a league with Catfish Rising and Crest of a Knave.

This was also an album where Jethro Tull stretched out musically. Anderson's new-found fascination with Middle Eastern music pushes some of these into sonically rich territory ("Rare and Precious Chain," "Dangerous Veils"), while some of the extended arrangements sound alot like old fashioned fusion music, especially the title track and "Veils." Martin Barre is still a guitar monster whose lead blasts show an artist that should get a lot more recognition that he does.

Anderson's turf is as defined as it has always been. He remains lyrically obtuse as ever ("Beside Myself") and delightfully cantankerous. His smirking "Wounded, Old and Treacherous" could easily have been a part of Too Old to Rock 'n' Roll: Too Young to Die! II should such an album exist. And the thinly disguised parable of "Valley" (world conflict as a battle for water between mountain communities) is wonderful. The lost world of old haunts, "Another Harry's Bar," is a quintessential old man's lament from a man who's penned his share (with echoes of classic Dire Straits). Also, if you were wondering, Anderson's flute playing is a predominant as ever."
Definitely, the Best of their 90's Material
Richard Thompson | El Paso, Texas | 03/24/2009
(4 out of 5 stars)

"This is truely one of the, if not the best, modern Tull albums. It's got tons of Flute on it! And, lots of nice orchestral arrangements leaving behind any remnents of the 80's sounding synths and electronic drums. There is a slight middle eastern flair to many of the songs, which works perfect with Ian's flute playing. Very enjoyable to listen too. The lyrics have a real original feel to them, with no reliance on repeating similar stylings or sections from their past works. This one deserves the high ratings it has received, 4 1/2 stars actually. It's just not quite a masterpeice, but close."
Last Real Tull Album, So Far!
J. Ittenbach | 02/10/2010
(5 out of 5 stars)

"They have spent a lot of time remastering their older products lately. This is a good thing because the recording sometimes did not accurately capture Tull's energy. I enjoyed JTull.com too but it felt more like an Ian Anderson solo effort to me. Most of the rest of their recent products have been rehash collections.

I enjoy Ian's solo CDs too and he put on a great performance with his Ian Anderson plays the acoustic Tull tour. The German guitarist he used was very good, but Roots to Branches seemed like the last real Tull album to me. I hope there will be some more though! Beside Myself was an awesome example of Tull arrangement and dynamics usage."