Search - Iggy Pop :: New Values

New Values
Iggy Pop
New Values
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
 
  •  Track Listings (12) - Disc #1

From his Motor City days with the band first known as the Psychedelic Stooges, or glamming it up with Reed and Bowie, or the occasional binge of onstage self-mutilation, Iggy Pop has always done what he damn well pleases. ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Iggy Pop
Title: New Values
Members Wishing: 7
Total Copies: 0
Label: Import [Generic]
Release Date: 6/30/1998
Album Type: Import
Genres: Alternative Rock, Pop, Rock, Classic Rock, Metal
Styles: Hardcore & Punk, New Wave & Post-Punk, Album-Oriented Rock (AOR)
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1

Synopsis

Album Description
From his Motor City days with the band first known as the Psychedelic Stooges, or glamming it up with Reed and Bowie, or the occasional binge of onstage self-mutilation, Iggy Pop has always done what he damn well pleases. Fortunately, in today's street parlance: "It's all good." Here is a razor-sharp, wiry classic from the Ig's mighty Arista period, recorded at the height of the punk/new wave era. Aided by the likes of ex-Stooges Scott Thurston and James Williamson, former Sex Pistol Glen Matlock and Patti Smith group alum Ivan Kral, Iggy shows all the pretenders how it's done on this cutting-edge platter -- on primal-scream hi-definition vinyl.

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CD Reviews

Excellent
Mark Twain | 03/18/2006
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album is fcking brilliant. I would recommend it to anyone, but I would especially recommend it to fans of Lou Reed or any VU stuff. This is a must have."
New Values
Morton | Colorado | 05/02/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"Iggy Pop-New Values *****

New Values found Iggy Pop working apart from David Bowie for the first time since The Stooges Funhouse, and back in touch with former one time partner James Williamson. With Bowie out of the picture and Williamson back in the fold Iggy released an album much rawer than that of his solo debut The Idiot, or his landmark, Lust For Life, the album that New Values is the follow up to. For me personally this has always been my favorite Iggy solo album. It is the most raw, stripped, and real feeling of all his work. While it might not have the hit singles of Lust or the atmospheric sound of The Idiot, and not as popular as his later albums it is his best.

The guitar sound for one is amazing, as is the playing from Williamson. Iggy's vocals and lyrics are some of his best as well. 'Tell Me A Story' which opens the album couldn't have been placed better. 'The Endless Sea' is a Iggy classic and a fan favorite live. 'Angel' is nice at times but others can be much. 'African Man' is incredible but it is 'Five Foot One' that is the real gem on the album. The autobiographical track is typical Iggy. With 'little mans disease' Iggy is short but thinks he can take on the world, more so then than now but still. Iggy's performance can be summed up with the lyrics to the track as well.

New Values was a return to form for Iggy. A return to the sound and attitude that landed him the title of godfather of punk."
The End of the Seventies
Mr. Richard D. Coreno | Berea, Ohio USA | 09/05/2008
(5 out of 5 stars)

"The first of a three album deal with Arista Records, Iggy Pop is collaborating with producer/guitarist James Williamson for a strong collection of songs that was released in September 1979.

Williamson's production is not cluttered and allows the cool performance art of Pop to take the spotlight in Tell Me a Story, I'm Bored, Five Foot One and Angel. The title track is drenched in a satirical look on society, while Billy is a Runaway has as much sonic power lyrically as musically.

And it is a true band that is in the studio, as Scott Thurston (b, key), Klaus Kruger (d) and Jackie Clark (b) give the numbers a "live" feel. Two bonus tracks - Chains, Pretty Flamingo - are included.

By this time, punk rock was reeling from top bands imploding and a pop culture cool that made style over substance the biggest selling point. But the "Godfather of Punk" was not ready to take to the surf of the new wave.

"