Search - Homesick James :: Got to Move

Got to Move
Homesick James
Got to Move
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

Homesick James Williamson (with noted possible relation to Sonny Boy) is one of those guys one doesn't automatically think of when considering Chicago blues, but eventually you work your way around to him. Got to Move was ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Homesick James
Title: Got to Move
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: 32. Jazz Records
Release Date: 2/1/2000
Genres: Blues, Jazz, Pop
Styles: Chicago Blues, Electric Blues, Slide Guitar
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 604123217521

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Homesick James Williamson (with noted possible relation to Sonny Boy) is one of those guys one doesn't automatically think of when considering Chicago blues, but eventually you work your way around to him. Got to Move was originally released in 1995, and rereleased (according to the liner notes) when the master was rescued from the wreckage of Hurricane Floyd. However it happened, it's worth hearing this, partly because it's a good reminder of the roots of Chicago blues and partly just because it's good. Williamson was well into his 80s when this was recorded, and his somewhat muddied vocals reflect his age, but his guitar hand is as steady as ever; there's some great picking on "Tin Pan Alley" and "Tennessee Woman." Like his cousin Elmore James, Williamson's also a handy man with a bottleneck; excellent slide work is featured on "Hawaiian Boogie" and "Got to Move." Unpretentious and rock solid, Got to Move combines the best of roots and Chicago blues. --Genevieve Williams
 

CD Reviews

At 86, Homesick can still make you move
Bryan E. Newbury | Madison, Georgia United States | 07/04/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Anyone with lineage like Homesick James (a cousin of Elmore James and possibly Sonny Boy Williamson) and a history of playing with Elmore, Big Bill, Sonnie Boy and Memphis Minnie... not to mention practically everyone else in Chicago during the post-war boom... HAS to be a great bluesman. The refreshing fact is that this album features Homesick, advancing in years, which you won't be able to tell by the music, as the featured artist, lending credence to the fact that he was, is and always will be a headliner in his own right. The highlights are "Mr. Pawnshop Man" and "Bein' with the One You Love," stellar examples of solo playing. If one were to fish for a weakness in this otherwise glowing album, it would be that "Highway 51" tends to trail off towards the end. If one isn't apt to knitpick, though, this album will get you moving from start to finish."