Search - Herbie Hancock :: Speak Like a Child

Speak Like a Child
Herbie Hancock
Speak Like a Child
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

In the midst of his stint working for Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock released two of his finest albums, 1965's Maiden Voyage and 1968's Speak Like a Child. Though the earlier disc may boast stronger players and more innovativ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Herbie Hancock
Title: Speak Like a Child
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Blue Note Records
Release Date: 10/25/1990
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
Styles: Jazz Fusion, Modern Postbebop, Bebop, Funk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 077774613620

Synopsis

Amazon.com
In the midst of his stint working for Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock released two of his finest albums, 1965's Maiden Voyage and 1968's Speak Like a Child. Though the earlier disc may boast stronger players and more innovative compositions, on Speak Hancock's true lyrical sensibilities come into light. The Carter-penned "First Trip" lets Hancock loose on the ivories, "Goodbye to Childhood" is meditative, and "The Sorcerer"--written by Hancock for Davis himself--swings. Thad Jones on flügelhorn, Peter Phillips on bass trombone, and Jerry Dodgion on alto flute all deliver impressive performances but Hancock--setting a tone for his fusion experiments to follow--steals the show. --James Hendrickson

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CD Reviews

Hancock's second classic Blue Note album
Dennis W. Wong | 06/05/2009
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I know one reviewed knocked one star off this classic album because it wasn't as great as "Maiden Voyage" but I'm still giving it 5 stars because it holds its own as great chamber jazz. I think Herbie accomplished his goal of creating an album that could come off as an "easy listening jazz side" or an orchestra jazz piece like Gil Evans (definitely an influence on Herbie). Another influence you hear throughout this wonderful album is Bill Evans particularly in his "Goodbye to Childhood" tracks. Maybe this lacks a Freddie Hubbard or George Coleman or the dynamics of Tony Williams who would've been too over-powering (Mickey Roker does fine here) but Herbie's intent is to focus on the music and not the soloing though he contributes a fine solo on the un-issued take of "Goodbye to Childhood". For all who are romantics at heart, this album is an antidote to the so-called New Age Music--relish it at your will!!"