Search - Herbie Hancock :: My Point of View

My Point of View
Herbie Hancock
My Point of View
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
 
  •  Track Listings (6) - Disc #1

24 bit digitally remastered Japanese reissue of classic Blue Note album in a miniaturized LP sleeve limited to the initial pressing only, and with the original artwork intact. Contains all five tracks from the original 196...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Herbie Hancock
Title: My Point of View
Members Wishing: 3
Total Copies: 0
Label: Blue Note Records
Release Date: 9/14/1999
Album Type: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
Genres: Jazz, Pop, R&B
Styles: Jazz Fusion, Modern Postbebop, Bebop, Funk
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 724352122622

Synopsis

Album Description
24 bit digitally remastered Japanese reissue of classic Blue Note album in a miniaturized LP sleeve limited to the initial pressing only, and with the original artwork intact. Contains all five tracks from the original 1963 issue. 1999 release.

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CD Reviews

Herbie's Best
Frank Bock | 07/17/2000
(5 out of 5 stars)

"In my opinion, this is Herbie Hancock's best bluenote album. Blind Man, Blind Man is a rewrite of Watermellon Man, but the addition of guitar (Grant Green) and trombone (Grachan Moncur III) give the arrangement a more interesting edge. The next two songs, A Tribute To Someone and King Cobra are the best that Herbie ever wrote. Hank Mobley and Donald Byrd play beautiful on them. Mobley in particular, never sounded so pretty before or after as he does here. And Tony Williams, eighteen on this recording, plays with the maturity and restraint of someone 3 times his age. A Tribute To Someone and King Cobra, to me, are better than anything Herbie Hancock ever recorded, solo or otherwise. That alone to me makes this record even more essential than Maiden Voyage or Emperyan Isles. The Pleasure is Mind is no Dolphin Dance and And What If I Don't is no Cantaloupe Island, but don't let that stop you from buying this. And don't let reviewers who dream of hearing Maiden Voyage Part II lead you to believe that My Point Of View is in any way inferior to anything Herbie ever recorded for bluenote. And as I mentioned before, if you are a fan of Hank Mobley (as I am) or Donald Byrd, both of them are in prime form. Mobley is at his best. Get the album."
Enjoyable, but not Essential
James D. Spackman | Houston, Tx | 07/13/2000
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Some nice, bluesy/funky writing, and good playing all around, but nothing spectacular. Despite the large group, the arrangements never get too busy. If you like Hancock, you'll like this CD, but it won't knock you off your feet like MAIDEN VOYAGE does."
Herbie has his way (but not his piano)
Samuel Chell | Kenosha,, WI United States | 06/12/2006
(4 out of 5 stars)

"Simply put, "Blind Man, Blind Man" is an attempt to come up with another "Watermelon Man" and scarcely rates one listen, so the addition of the alternate take is hardly a bonus (though Mobley deserves some credit for coming up with a few things to say on a single Bb7 chord). The other tracks are highly worthy Hancock originals, full of unusual melody making and unexpected harmonies. "Tribute to Someone" contains a risk-taking yet complete and satisfying solo by Mobley, who also takes chances on "And What If I Don't," faltering a bit this time but still communicative.

"King Cobra" and "The Pleasure Is Mine" are showcases for Hancock's composing and arranging skills, his close harmonizations of the three horns producing some of the richest textures I've ever heard by him. Here Byrd, Mobley, and Moncur form a tight and responsive choir to the antiphonal statements of piano and guitar.

Recording engineer Van Gelder has always had a talent for making his horns sound bigger than life as well as for bringing out all of the sizzle and ring in a drummer's ride cymbal. But the sound of his pianos is always muffled and "bottled up," at best an acquired taste. On this recording, the trademark Van Gelder piano sound is more in evidence than ever. Frankly, I would like to be able to hear Herbie's own idea of how a piano should sound."