Search - Spike Robinson, Al Cohn :: Henry B. Meets Alvin G. Once in a Wild

Henry B. Meets Alvin G. Once in a Wild
Spike Robinson, Al Cohn
Henry B. Meets Alvin G. Once in a Wild
Genres: Jazz, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (9) - Disc #1

"The teaming of Robinson and Cohn is a happy and productive one in the Cohn-Sims tradition. As with his previous partner, Al manages (with Spike's sensitive collaboration) to show how much a pair of tenors can bring to the...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Spike Robinson, Al Cohn
Title: Henry B. Meets Alvin G. Once in a Wild
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 0
Label: Capri Records
Release Date: 9/12/2000
Genres: Jazz, Pop
Style: Cool Jazz
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 054987400629

Synopsis

Album Description
"The teaming of Robinson and Cohn is a happy and productive one in the Cohn-Sims tradition. As with his previous partner, Al manages (with Spike's sensitive collaboration) to show how much a pair of tenors can bring to their teamwork. Let's not think of this as a confrontation or competition, but rather as a happy and justified juxtaposition, one that will be repeated in the years to come, now that Spike is out there where he always belonged." - Leonard Feather (Author of "The Jazz Years Farwitness to an Era," Da Capo Press) (from liner notes)
 

CD Reviews

Last Chance
Samuel Chell | Kenosha,, WI United States | 06/23/2004
(5 out of 5 stars)

"I'm surprised to see this one still in the catalog. Al Cohn's tenor prowess throughout his career is widely documented in numerous musical contexts, though some of his best long-playing recordings (especially "Cohn on the Saxophone" and "The Blues Is Everybody's Business") are unlikely ever to be released on CD. Home-town hero Spike Robinson (he graduated from high school in Kenosha, Wisconsin) is another matter. Waiting until the mid-1980's and his mid-50's to devote full time to playing his horn (he worked as an engineer), he had little time to make his mark before suffering a rather precipitous decline in health during the last half of the 1990's. It's doubtful that more than 5 or 6 of his recordings are still available. This is certainly one of his best (an album he made of the music of Harry Warren is also worth chasing down). Whereas Cohn began to play more aggressively and extrovertishly with the passing years, Spike held to a lyrical and thoughtful Getz line. It serves him well. Listen carefully to the opening number, "Sippin' at Bell's," and feel free to judge between the seasoned veteran (Cohn had recorded with Coltrane and numerous jazz all-stars) and the late bloomer. Spike's sense of melodic line places him in the driver's seat, distinguishing him as a player with uncanny vision, capable of executing non-stop, elaborate, purposeful melodic ideas that come to a momentary pause only when there's a need to breathe. Spike's best work on record is on these rare occasions when he's in the challenging company of an Al Cohn, a Ray Brown, or a Victor Feldman. And since he lived in Europe during most of his music career, those moments were all too infrequent. All the more reason to pick up this recording, which is every bit as satisfying as some of the memorable Al Cohn-Zoot Sims meetings, though I wouldn't expect it to be available for much longer."