Search - Harry Connick;Jr. :: 30

30
Harry Connick;Jr.
30
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
 
  •  Track Listings (14) - Disc #1

After 1988's 20 and 1992's 25, Harry Connick adds another chapter to his series of pared-down piano-and-voice albums. 30 is essentially a man and his keys--you have to wait until the fifth track, "If I Were a Bell," for a ...  more »

      
   
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CD Details

All Artists: Harry Connick;Jr.
Title: 30
Members Wishing: 0
Total Copies: 1
Label: SonyBMG Special Markets
Release Date: 3/24/2008
Genres: Jazz, Pop, Broadway & Vocalists
Styles: Swing Jazz, Traditional Jazz & Ragtime, Vocal Jazz, Oldies, Vocal Pop, Traditional Vocal Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 886972665320

Synopsis

Amazon.com
After 1988's 20 and 1992's 25, Harry Connick adds another chapter to his series of pared-down piano-and-voice albums. 30 is essentially a man and his keys--you have to wait until the fifth track, "If I Were a Bell," for a bass to finally sneak in. Connick starts things off with Fats Domino's "I'm Walkin'" and continues with another low-down boogie, an instrumental version of the Mack Gordon/Harry Warren song "Chattanooga Choo Choo." The material's fairly conservative (Connick's a traditionalist through and through) and usually fulfills its relatively modest aims--which, after all, is more than can be said about many records. Cole Porter's "Don't Fence Me In," for instance, acquires a nice boogie shuffle. Wynton Marsalis adds understated trumpet to the last track, "I'll Only Miss Her (When I Think of Her)," but the Reverend James Moore's vocals on "There Is Always One More Time" are a little too overheated in this record's minimal context. --Elisabeth Vincentelli

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Member CD Reviews

Susan D. from STATESBORO, GA
Reviewed on 8/9/2006...
Lovely music. Nice variety. He is always great.

CD Reviews

Funky and playful
R. L. MILLER | 02/09/2003
(4 out of 5 stars)

"I enjoyed his previous album, "25," which was a similar type of album: playful, pared-down and intimate, showcasing Connick's natural singing and piano skills. I particularly enjoyed that and also this album, "30." Connick's singing style is easy and strong, without being too processed or smooth; I particularly liked songs which showcase his imaginative and offbeat renditions on the piano, such as "Chattanooga Choo Choo" and "Somewhere My Love." These were refreshing and I wish more artists had the talent to showcase their takes on songs without "having" to sing a note. This is a thoroughly enjoyable album and I hope more listeners understand what he is doing with it -- and really "get" it."
Can't recommend this one
Greg Brady | Capital City | 11/12/2005
(2 out of 5 stars)

"For starters, if you love Connick's croon you don't get it very much on this album. It's primarily a showcase for his work on the ivories.

Those who know Connick well realize his capacity on the instrument and his ability to re-invent dusty classics and make them new again. (His take on "Sleigh Ride" from WHEN HARRY MET SALLY was a great example.) Unfortunately, most of these numbers, while experimental, just don't work that well in the end.

Case in point: Harry's attempt to inflate 70s piffle "Tie a Yellow Ribbon 'Round the Ole Oak Tree" into grand player piano roll music. He succeeds in making it sound "old" but not in imbuing it with elegance..it's simply a fluffy piece of pop music and the arrangement only succeeds in demonstrating the lack of substance underneath the fluff in the Tony Orlando rendition.

HIGHLIGHTS:
Gospelly "There is Always One More Time" gets a lot of its punch from Reverend James Moore's vocals and organ playing. Porter standby "Don't Fence me In" gets a nice Nawlins' shuffle and a relaxed vocal from Connick.

LOWS:
"I'm Walkin'" completely enervates the Fats Domino classic of all its drive and forces this listener to realize how much that song's greatness derives from Domino's exuberant singing and the Dave Bartholomew rhythm section. Bleah. "The Gypsy" is a complete yawn. The aforementioned "Tie a Yellow Ribbon" is another miss.

BOTTOM LINE:
I got this one for free as a promo while working as a record store clerk. It was worth what I paid. Skip this one."