Search - Gerardo Nunez :: Calima

Calima
Gerardo Nunez
Calima
Genres: World Music, Pop, Rock, Latin Music
 
  •  Track Listings (10) - Disc #1

Calima translates as "heat," and that's exactly what nuevo flamenco guitar virtuoso Gerardo Núñez generates on his sophomore release. Nowhere is it better typified than on "Sancti Petri," his incendiary collaboration with ...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: Gerardo Nunez
Title: Calima
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Alula
Original Release Date: 1/13/1998
Release Date: 1/13/1998
Genres: World Music, Pop, Rock, Latin Music
Style: Latin Pop
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPCs: 616498100728, 8428353600319

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Calima translates as "heat," and that's exactly what nuevo flamenco guitar virtuoso Gerardo Núñez generates on his sophomore release. Nowhere is it better typified than on "Sancti Petri," his incendiary collaboration with two other guitarists, the duo of Strunz & Farah, where cascades of notes go by virtually faster than the ear can take them in. Elsewhere Núñez plays a variety of flamenco styles, including sevillanas and bulerías, as well as an ambitious paso doble. But while Núñez has his roots in the tradition, he doesn't stick to it religiously. Like most nuevo flamenco players, he expands the genre, taking in jazz on the title track with sterling piano work from Danilo Pérez. He also journeys into New Age territory as well as pure worldbeat. Núñez leaves plenty of room for sparkling improvisation on the balmy closer, "Tarifa," where bassist John Patitucci shines. Essentially, this album shows Núñez to be a flamenco musician for the 21st century, a man coming into his prime as an artist. --Chris Nickson

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CD Reviews

Real "new" flamenco
Kalenski2 | Irvine CA | 04/17/2004
(4 out of 5 stars)

"For fans, this is really Nunez redux. To my mind, that makes it all the better, seeing that he brings experience and maturity to the pieces.Gerardo is a guitarist who has got lumped with the whole "nuevo flamenco" movement. This is an injustice. Here we have an album that shows true innovation within an authentic flamenco framework, rather than a kitsch pastiche, as perpetrated by Ottmar Liebert et al.Now, while I might agree with some in the flamenco world who might argue that Gerardo is not true "flamenco puro" and will point to the likes of Nino Ricardo as masters of duende, the enlightened of that group should still accept this work. To do otherwise would be akin to dismissing Eric Clapton because he doesn't convey the same blues authenticity that Robert Johnson did; who cares? He's taking it further.The pieces here are not all new: many have appeared in different, even more "technique-oriented" versions on his Spain-only albums "El Gallo Azul" and others (those who like Calima really should try to get this album, as it is awesome). However, what we have here is confidence, economy and confidence. His Bulerias, which in "Gallo" far outstrips any Jorge Strunz excursion for sheer stunning technical display, in this album is relatively restrained, but masterful. His other pieces, espcially "Tabaco Y Oro" show sheer poetry in his touch, something almost every guitarist outside of flamenco (even S&F) seem incapable of emulating. And the Jazz-fusion pieces are truly awesome pieces that remind me of some of the best Chick Corea recordings (a tribute to Danilo). Of course, an example of this "touch" is in his trio piece with S&F. While they run out their predictable flurries of notes (albeit, a little out of sync, would you believe?), Gerardo seems almost as though he doesn't want to be brought down to that level, instead laying out a powerful, alzapua-driven solo that is pure feeling. In some respects more melodic than Paco de Lucia and certainly more accessible, both flamenco novices and enlightened afficianados alike should find something here. I certainly hope he records again."