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Somewhere Down in Texas
George Strait
Somewhere Down in Texas
Genres: Country, Pop
 
  •  Track Listings (11) - Disc #1

Country's most reluctant superstar can always lend gravity to even the weakest of songs, so masterful is his phrasing and restrained, expressive delivery, and so artful his picking and the production that surrounds his Eve...  more »

      
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CD Details

All Artists: George Strait
Title: Somewhere Down in Texas
Members Wishing: 1
Total Copies: 0
Label: Mca Nashville
Release Date: 6/28/2005
Genres: Country, Pop
Styles: Western Swing, Today's Country, Neotraditional
Number of Discs: 1
SwapaCD Credits: 1
UPC: 602498810705

Synopsis

Amazon.com
Country's most reluctant superstar can always lend gravity to even the weakest of songs, so masterful is his phrasing and restrained, expressive delivery, and so artful his picking and the production that surrounds his Everyman baritone. On Somewhere Down in Texas, many of George Strait's songs are semiautobiographical and ring with authenticity. The title track portrays a man who's weary of the road and yearns to stay home with his family; "Texas" salutes the state that made him what he is; and "You'll Be There," the heartfelt single that talks of meeting a loved one in the afterlife, likely hits a nerve with the singer, who lost a child some years ago. Strait also does well with the terrible twins of country dance-hall fare, misery and grief--particularly on the honky-tonk weeper "Ready for the End of the World" and the killer ballad "Good News, Bad News," a duet with Lee Ann Womack, who cowrote the tune with Dean Dillon and Dale Dodson. Womack sings rings around her fellow Texan, giving her reading of this exquisite song of heartbreak an emotional resonance that sticks in the mind long after it's over. But Strait conveys a stoic acceptance of a tragically missed chance at love, and it plays just right for a cowboy antihero. Somewhere Down in Texas could have benefited from the addition of an irresistible rhythm tune or another example of the western swing that Strait embraced so fervently early in his career. But every time ol' George refers to his heroes by name--Haggard, Nelson, and Jones--you know time will show him to be, if not precisely in their league, certainly a close second. --Alanna Nash Recommended George Strait
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CD Reviews

One of his best...
J. E. Logan | Phoenix, AZ | 06/29/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"George really goes out on a limb on this album and puts some big production in the back of his songs. But when you boil it down it still has the steel guitars and fiddles of all Strait songs. Put it down as you may but die-hard Strait fans, like myself, will totally enjoy this album and recommend to anyone who loves country music!"
Great as Always, and More Traditional Than Recent George
AWU2 | New York, NY & Pittsburgh, PA | 06/29/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"This album is a little more "Texas" than George's recent stuff. It starts with "If the Whole World Was A Honky Tonk" which is classic George. Then you have the title track that is along the lines of the slow tunes of the middle years. Track #3 "The Seashores of Old Mexico" was written by one of his biggest influences, Merle Haggard. "You'll be there" has already received well-deserved acclaim. "Good News, Bad News" a duet with LeAnn Womack (his first duet with a female recording artist, I think?) is enough to have anyone throw themselves off a bridge -- George Jones/Tammy Wynette come to mind. "Oh What a Perfect Day" is another track that would fit comfortably on past almbums such as Ocean Front Property. Fittingly "Texas" may be the best track on the album. It's hard to imagine any country artist today that's more Pure Country. Another outstanding effort. You can't be at the top this long unless you have this level of consistency.
"
Texan, American, and Avid Cyclist
P. Stanford | Littleton, CO USA | 06/28/2005
(5 out of 5 stars)

"He hits it deep and it is gone. This is another home run by George Strait. Listening to the entire CD makes me wonder if this is his last one. Somewhere Down in Texas may be the song he takes into the sunset. The same one he says he will watch from his porch in Texas. Nothing needs to be said for You'll be There because it is all in the song. I believe his theme song just may be Texas. Bad News, Good News is a wonderful duet with Lee An Womack. If this is his last one he goes out big."